Sketchbook 7-30-16 #1

Blue Fin 50 Passagemaker

Length 50’-2”
Beam 12’-8”
Draft 50”
Disp. Est. 43,000 lbs.
Sail Area 672 sq. ft. in 3 sails total

You would have to agree with me that these are strange times in the U.S. and with an election coming soon, hate is literally promoted as a patriotic reaction to a rapidly changing world and good ole religious ferment is having expressions of violence on an almost daily occurrence. This makes me a nervous guy, and I am not alone in this feeling and reaction. But any keen observer of politics, and world news would know that this is really nothing new, it simply gets more play on the outlets for information media, social, print and screen. No one knows what to believe any more in a world where lying is an everyday occurrence and any fool can promote whatever agenda they wish and in a keystroke it is disseminated around the earth almost instantly.

But enough of this nonsense, let’s think of a proper design to sail to the ends of the earth while we still can freely and safely and this design would be one of my proposals for the proper platform to do that with. I note that the Bluefin 50 Passagemaker first started with a sheet of paper on my drafting table in early 2012 (if I am to believe my notes), visited about every six months till current times and I just today blew the dust off her to show to you.

Bluefin50PassagemakerC

Hallmarks are a box keel with almost full headroom in the engine room, a heavy and tall John Deere diesel engine in the box, with shaft in a straight alleyway to the stern. Ballast in the bottom of the box keel in two forms the first layer on the proper bottom of the keel box being made of a full 1 ½” keel shoe of type 316 stainless steel. This affords grounding possibilities and upright stance on any shelving beach. Just above that in the bilge is another 8000 lbs. of lead shot in an epoxy matrix in the bottom of the box. The epoxy means we have a smooth and easy to clean bilge but with the keel shoe and the epoxy/lead shot you have a lot of stability in the base of the boat.

You can see easily the layout, a three cabin version, galley up, proper sleeping cabin forward sporting full head and shower and aft a sitting room with its own head, quarter berth and dinette table either functioning as a shaded and private living room in the evening or if your inclined to take crew they would have a private space away from the skipper and first mate.

Bluefin50PassagemakerT

A simple sailing rig, two jibs on roller furling, and a boom furled mainsail all this set on a tabernacle mast (just in case I take a notion to want to do some canal cruising), the sail panels small enough to be easily handled but adding to make literally twice the effective cruising range to the vessel.

Twin booms on the sheer that hinge out to 45 degree angles each side fly paravanes on a chain/nylon line pendants, this is the most effective and simple way to add extra stability to a vessel when the weather and sea conditions dictate the necessity.

She is purposeful, uses all the tricks in the book for an easy to use Passagemaker boat that is stable and has good capacity for cruising all waters, mid to high latitudes and for getting onto cruising while we still have the capability of doing so! Enjoy.. Sam

Bluefin50Passagemaker

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Blue Peter 30

A glimpse into a boat capable of true off-shore cruising, Blue Peter is offered in two versions that illustrate just how much variation can happen on the same footprint.

The rig change is most dramatic. From a profile sail plan view with one version showing bowsprit and a more open slot between staysail and jib to the other showing a stem headed sail plan. Moving inside, the stem-headed version shows the interior that is my personal favorite. Stepping into the companionway, one can see clearly to the bow of the boat. By keeping the head aft and to starboard, it doesn’t cut up the interior into two separate cabins. The galley is to port with enough space to get the job done and with close proximity to the cockpit, a quick duck below for a cup of tea during a long night watch is possible.

Large port and starboard settees with a dinette table amidships allows comfortable seating and the chance to sit and tell stories with friends. Relaxing after a long day’s sail seems more important with the older I get. The port and starboard settees and double berth forward accommodate a crew of four.

The bowsprit version shows a much different interior with port and starboard quarter berths and a fixed chart table to starboard used by sitting on the end of the starboard berth. The galley is to port with a peninsula into the cabin to allow a close-to-centerline sink location, good for draining on either tack. The port and starboard settees, somewhat offset, don’t allow for as easy a conversation area as the other interior but should work well at sea with berths on either tack.

The head with shower is on the starboard side and a single forward berth is to the opposite. This interior would probably cruise off-shore more efficiently than the other with more possible sea berths but in my view, it isn’t quite as comfortable for on shore cruising where most evenings, the Blue Peter would be anchored in a quiet cove.

Inboard diesel power of up to 18 hp is a must on a boat like Blue Peter. Being as fine a mate as most, she’s a good looking boat with an agreeable profile. — Sam Devlin

The Blue Peter is available as a custom build from Sam and his team.

Blue Peter 30 Specifications

Length (LOD) 30 ft. – 2 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 55 in.
Power Inboard diesel 18hp
Hull Type Displacement

 

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Moss Rock

Moss Rock began life as the solution to the living requirements of a client. He wanted to live on the water in a simple, roomy comfortable boat that was easy to maintain. He also wanted a stable platform in which to cruise Puget Sound with his aging parents.

The result is a rig that is simple and inexpensive, a gaff sloop with galvanized rigging. The volume needed for a live-aboard also suggested the scow-type hull. That shape also yields an interior that is roomy and comfortable which, with the right touch, has a cottage coziness. The port aft section easily accommodates a standard double mattress with the settee and chart table completing the port mid-section. The head has a water closet and a self-contained shower unit located in the starboard mid-section next to the galley and the wood or diesel heating stove. The center board trunk divides the cabin providing pantry shelves on the galley side and book shelves on the port side. The cabin has full standing headroom with the large port lights keeping the interior well-lit and homey.

The deck plan shows no footwell aft; a helm seat accompanies the large wheel. Auxiliary power can be in the form of an inboard diesel with the shaft set off-center or a 35 HP outboard in a well.

The foredeck has a large 36 in x 36 in hatch giving access to organized stowage below. There are 10 inch bulwarks fore and aft and a raised deck in the way of a deck house. Moss Rock exudes a charm of her own and would not look out of place in a wooded cove with sails furled and potted plants on the decks. — Sam Devlin

The Moss Rock is available as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

MossRockPlanRoughMossRockProfileRough

Moss Rock Specifications

Length on Deck 30 ft. – 0 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 24 in.
Power Inboard diesel or outboard 35hp
Hull Type Displacement
Sail area 527 sq. ft.
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Means of Grace

MeansOfGraceSideMeans of Grace was designed for a friend that has owned one of our Surf Scoters for the last 5 years. He has found himself at a career crossroad that allows him to contemplate extensive cruising. Originally I thought that a 38′ ketch would handle his needs most efficiently. After months of sketches and discussions, he became concerned that 38′ would be too large for him to handle alone and that an interim design would be appropriate. The smaller boat, Means of Grace, would be more manageable short-handed which reminds me that the most important function of a boat is its usability. If a boat is not usable from both a physical and mental point of view, then it is not successful.

“Cush” was quite taken with the Lyle Hess-designed, Bristol Channel Cutter, and so Means of Grace shares several similar concepts. The footprint is that of a small, heavy displacement boat with a true cutter rig. The interior is similar, and from an inspirational point of view, the Bristol Channel Cutter served as a nice starting place for the design.

MeansofGraceMagI consulted in depth with Carol Hasse of Port Townsend Sails on the sail plan. Carol has extensive off-shore sailing experience and she and her partner manufacture a most lovely sail.

As a result of Carol’s suggestions, we have an inventory of 7 sails. This covers every wind speed in approximately 10 knot increments from 0 to 80 knots. The final sail plan is a main tri-sail, either alone, or with a heavy storm stay’-sail. With this much possibility in sail combination, Cush can sail on his own beloved Maine coast, or off-shore on long ocean passages. — Sam Devlin

The Means of grace is available as study and full construction plans.

MeansOfGracePlan

Means of Grace Specifications

Length on Deck 28 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 60 in.
Power Inboard diesel
Sail Area 537 sq. ft.
Hull Type Displacement
Displacement 12900 lbs.
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Onyx

OnyxHullMost of our work with stitch-and-glue composite construction has been with single-chine, vee-bottom vessels. As inevitably happens, either a customer comes along in need of a little more shape in the hull or because of our own growth process, we decide it’s time to test our wings a bit and try some new ground. The Onyx is a true multi-chine design.

As you look at the sections, it’s not hard to imagine her as a round bottomed hull with some defining laps. The laps are, of course, plywood panels, and she is indeed a stitch-and-glue composite construction boat. We have taken theOnyxSideFull dimensions of a small but capable off-shore vessel, with an outboard rudder and inboard rig contributing to her simplicity and seaworthiness. She has what I consider to be my favorite type of interior, with the galley to port, head to starboard and a graceful trunk cabin providing 6’3″ headroom. Forward are the port and starboard settees with comfortable seating for all my guests. A cabin table can be fitted that’s attached to the mast, an option available to the user. Forward is a large double berth and a chain locker in the bow. A foredeck hatch can provide ventilation and some handy sail-handling access.

All in all, she is simple, looks efficient and I believe would be a capable vessel compared to most available. — Sam Devlin

 

The Onyx is available in study and construction plans, and as a custom build from Devlin boats.

OnyxPlan

Onyx Specifications

Length on Deck 27 ft. – 7 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 54 in.
Power Inboard diesel
Sail Area 401 sq. ft.
Hull Type Displacement
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Oysta 42

Oysta42SideA problem many boaters have is the unequal interests of their spouses in their real or imagined cruising adventures and, most specifically in “sailing” cruising adventures. Along came an East Coast customer who wished to spend the second half of his life with his wife continuing as his partner. It’s always a ticklish design issue, attempting to make a boat comfortable and unique enough to hold the interest of a less-than-eager spouse, yet capable and challenging enough to hold the interest and enthusiasm of the more experienced partner.

The Oysta 42 was specified to be a “motor sailer.” And not just a sailboat with an auxiliary engine. The Oysta 42 is a true 50/50 motor sailer capable of motoring through any sea condition; with the sail-assist it’s capable of doubling its useful cruising range from 1500 miles under power alone to better-than-3,000 miles with sail. And keeping an engine running affords a lot of comfort and luxury on board, while sail alone might work against the less willing crew member’s enthusiasm. An inboard low aspect ratio ketch rig was chosen to work within the design framework. Both masts are on tabernacles so that the rig can be easily lowered for canal passages. The aft pilot house design was selected allowing a large shaded (with boom canvas) outside deck area for carefree warm weather anchorages.

Oysta42RenderLooking at the accommodations, one can see a large, forward master cabin as a private refuge. The head is clear up in the bows of the boat with a separate shower and enough room to dress in leisurely comfort. There are bureaus and hanging lockers for clothing and stowage for a long cruise, and a reading seat to allow some private moments away from other crew members. Just aft of the master’s cabin is a separate cabin with its own access from a large 3 x 3′ deck hatch (which also functions as a mid-deck table). With port and starboard berths, this cabin functions as a crew’s quarters or the guest cabin for visiting family members or friends. Access to the large engine room is through the aft bulkhead of the guest cabin.

Power can be either twin small diesels of 50 hp each, or with one large single diesel of 100-120 hp. My own choice would be twin 4 cylinder 50 hp diesels as the maneuvering edge gained by twin engine installation more than justifies the small additional cost. And while motor-sailing, the lee sided engine can be left running which helps keep the shipboard electrics in shape.

In effect, the two diesels function like a built-in generator providing 12 volt and 110 AC power through high-output alternators and generous battery bank storage capabilities. Fuel tankage allows a range of 1,500 nautical miles under power alone.

Moving aft past the large mid cockpit, the pilot house is entered through port and starboard sliding doors, and features a centerline mounted helm with inside-or-outside steering, chart table to starboard, galley to port, and a real bridge to work the boat from. Stepping aft and down is a huge settee with a large table and enough room to accommodate 6 adults. A small head is off to port for quick access from the pilothouse and salon.

With tabernacle rigs, a displacement of 24,000 lbs., modest draft of 5’0″ and room enough for a long cruise, I can just imagine leaving the snow behind for warm Caribbean winds, with good ripe local fruit and pungent island rum – and best of all with my favorite mate to enthusiastically share my adventure. — Sam Devlin

The Oysta 42 is available in study plans and as a custom build from Sam Devlin and his crack crew.

Oysta42Top

Oysta 42 Specifications

Length 42 ft. – 1 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 1 in.
Draft 60 in.
Power Inboard diesel, twin 50hp or single 100-150hp
Displacement 28000 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Sail Area 481 sq. ft.
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Josephine 40

Josephine40shortmast

 

In extensively cruising my 1934 salmon troller Josephine, I’ve come to appreciate many of her qualities. She’s a strong boat, comfortable in a rolling sea, and graceful in a classic workboat sense. Owning a stitch and glue boat business, it was only natural for me to take what I felt are the best parts of Josephine and adapt them to my method of boatbuilding. The result is a boat with all the aesthetic appeal of the original with the added benefits of increased interior room and decreased boat weight. The result is the Josephine 40.

It would do little good to belabor the various layouts in writing as the study plans will do a far better job. Submitted to you, dear reader and future Captain, are a number of idea drawings ranging from a working salmon fishing troller/fishboat to a motorsailor to a flybridge expedition yacht. Of course, the Josephine 40 can be built to whatever reasonable configuration the owner chooses. Give the shop a call so we can set up a time to talk about the particulars. The waters are waiting for you. – Sam Devlin

The Josephine 40 is an extensive design. The study plans are available to help you get a handle on the many options.

Josephine 40 Specifications

Length 40 ft. – 9 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 53 in.
Power Inboard diesel
Displacement 28000 lbs. – 42000 lbs. (Full fishhold)
Hull Type Displacement
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Hope of Glory

The Hope Of Glory is another of our fantailed stern hulls with a lovely balance to her lines and a ketch rig for proper and easy sail handling by a short-handed crew.

HoGop

Hope and Glory Specifications

Length 38 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 52 in.
Power Inboard diesel 15hp
Displacement 22400 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
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Shearwater 38

This design was done for my co-worker, Lee Sandifur, who has steadfastly stood by my side for decades now and was the result of a coffee break conversation as to what his true dreamboat might flush out as. Believe it or not, we started by thinking about a version of our Czarinna 35 with twin outboards in wells for power and many hours later, the Shearwater 38 is where we finally landed.

I think the first idea put forward that tended to de-rail that Czarinna 35 train was Lee’s desire to do some high-latitudes cruising with the boat. I just couldn’t see a cruiser like the Czarinna 35 with outboard power really working for that type of cruising and I soon laid a fresh sheet of paper on the “ol drafting table” and we finally ended up with what you see enclosed.

So let’s take a look at the Shearwater 38 and see if we might strike a pang of desire in your own heart. As for me, I was smitten as soon as she fleshed out, easily seeing myself cruising about in her visiting many secluded and remote spots. She shares the aft house configuration of the Oysta / “Annie” types that have been dealt with in other designs with doors on both sides of the pilothouse that give access to the main cabin. There is a good helm area with space to share at the centerline wheel for the first mate (or other chums). A dinette with table on the port side and another settee to starboard allow good conversation and refreshment once you get the anchor down. Going down a couple of steps from the pilothouse, there is a galley to starboard and another seating area but I didn’t put a table in this space as the one in the pilothouse will serve that function but one could be fitted if desired. The single head is also accessed in this space with water closet up in the port edge, a sink fitted literally under the settee/dinette seat in the pilothouse above, and a shower fitted just outboard of the sink. A door at the front of this head compartment opens up a passageway that moves forward below the seats in the pilothouse, under the raised portion of the mid/waist deck and then into the forward sleeping cabin. In the pilothouse where the port side seat burns out, I show a hinged flap that either gives headroom to the passageway or allows the pilothouse door on the port side to be accessed and exit of the pilothouse can be done on either side.

Shearwater38CabinDetail

Once you’re in the fo’c’sle/sleeping cabin, there is literally not much to say except that there are two very comfortable and very accessible berths and plenty of lockers for gear. There is also another companionway that exits to the waist deck area and back on the deck. Access to the front of the engine room is accomplished from the fo’c’sle/sleeping cabin or from the port passageway that connects the stern to the forward cabin, via sliding doors on the side of the engine room.

There an anchor well deck up in the bows of the boat and here I would lodge a hydraulic anchor windlass with reel. These are great windlasses to choose from that hold plenty of rode and lots of chain connected to the anchor. They are run with a “b” series hydraulic pump off the engine and are about as trouble free as one can get anchoring. Another advantage of this type of anchoring gear is to keep the chain and rode out of the interior of the boat. If they come up off the bottom dirty and smelly, the rain will wash them off and it really helps to keep the interior of the boat in clean, dry shape.

As for the deck and working the boat, there is the mast forward with boom that could accommodate a simple sail, the forestay could be fitted with a roller furling jib, and the mizzen shows a small area steadying sail. For trade winds work, this rig could add considerably to the thrust of the engine and extend her range to oceanic levels if desired. The boom, in a lowered position, can fit up a good cockpit boom tent to provide shade outside when the sun is out. I also show stabilizer poles that hinge from the deck edge and are guyed to the mizzen mast for running in really rough waters. With small area and simple to set sails, poles guyed out and paravanes working away, this boat could run in just about any waters, safely and comfortably.

Shearwater38Side

Lee’s idea is to group fund the rest of the design and I know that he is hoping against hope that his own ship might come in and fund the actual build of her. I hope you all enjoyed the Shearwater and if you’re interested in helping with the funding of the final design, please feel free to contact either myself or Lee. – Sam Devlin

The Shearwater 38 is available as study plans. Please contact Sam if you would like to join in the development of a great traveling boat.

Shearwater38Top

Shearwater 38 Specifications

Length 37 ft. – 8 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 2 in.
Draft 48 in.
Power Inboard diesel 74-150hp
Displacement 28000 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
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Kokanee 36

Kokanee36FAThis was a letter written to the Customer that commissioned this little Sailing Fishing Boat design. It’s a beguiling type for any of us lucky enough to have worked in the far north fishing or tugging in our youth, and it answers well to the “Siren call of the North” when in the early Spring my heart wants nothing more than to follow the vees of Geese winging their way North. Keep in mind that as of the writing of this, a fresh Chinook Salmon, troll caught, sells off the boat for more than $5 dollars a pound. That means a 30lb. fish would fetch the ship and crew more than $150 dollars in revenue and the prospect that a middle aged person or two might fish/adventure their way to a $50,000 dollar summer.

Sean: Enclosed are the preliminary drawings for the Sailing Fishing/boat that we have been talking about. I am really pleased with how this design has worked out so far and look forward to doing more work with this concept. I have spliced a pretty livable cabin arrangement onto the 36ft. hull as we had talked about. She has enough room to be a comfortable cruiser, carry the loads associated with cruising for extended periods, and taking care of the fishing request with this design. The cockpit area is spacious enough for her purpose but has no wasted or extra space. A raised Fish/hold placed in the middle of the cockpit being the main feature, but while this space allocation might seem to be wasteful, in truth the table top area and work space is ideal for the cruiser. A small 24″ x 24″ hatch provides access into the compartment when just checking on the fish or ice conditions and the whole top is removable for unloading fish or loading the space. A small trolling cockpit is located in the stern of the boat and needs to have steering and helm controls for single-handed work. It might even be a good idea these days to have a repeater for the GPS and an Autopilot control to help keep you on course while working at fishing back in that cockpit.Kokanee36Top

The pilothouse is entered thru a sliding door in the rear bulkhead, with galley on the portside and settee/dinette and helm on the starboard side. There is enough space to drink or eat 4 and plenty of room for the designed ship’s crew of two. A Stainless steel pipe compression post for the deck stepped mast gives a good handhold in the pilothouse when in rough weather and the seatback on the helm can be canted back and forth to function as a back in helm or in dinette mode. The table can be lowered to provide a second double berth for guests that might come along for the trip. The fo’c’sle is accessed by going down 4 steps with a large enclosed head to port with shower in the front section. To starboard are a couple of hanging lockers, the one just below the helm being the mechanicals locker with all electrical and breaker functions easily accessible and spare parts organized in shelves. Another hanging locker is located forward of the mechanicals locker and a bureau with storage below is forward of that. A double queen sized berth is to port in the cabin with the heads forward arrangement, good reading lights and a good view looking aft up thru the boat. It’s a berth arrangement that we have worked and cruised many times in the past with good success.

Now back on deck, let’s discuss how she runs and works. I’ve kept the sailing rig as small as I could and still have enough drive to function well. The total sail area is 348 and with a roller furling system on the jib, it should work well. Fishing with the sails up needs to be controlled with the trolling poles functioning best if kept fairly level and upright. With this much sail area and while trolling, the engine is barely running. It’s just keeping up with the hydraulic system demands and providing a little bit of additional steerage-way while the wind provides the rest of the propulsion when it’s blowing enough. With the jib rolled up, the main can be left standing as a working steady sail and should help keep her from lurching side to side when in confused seas. Trolling poles and all sails are set from the aft cockpit and cleat to the end of the pilothouse with turning blocks forward to keep you off the pilothouse roof. I would rig a crab and shrimp pot puller as shown for either augmenting the ship’s provisions or perhaps for a little extra cash commercially. Side decks are suitable for walking up forward to the bow and anchoring duty. By the way, a hydraulic anchor windlass is chucked up on the bow with a 300 ft. chain rode backed by an additional 150 ft. of nylon rode so there shouldn’t be any loss of sleep at night due to dragging anchor gear. I showed a bow thruster forward if for no other reason than to just stimulate conversation about it for the future. I always maintain that the more control one has over their environment, the better off the success of the venture. Avoiding sticky situations is always the best survival mode.

I think that about wraps it up; a good and stable boat, with enough room to carry some fish or stores and enough space to be comfortable for our great waters out here. Let’s hope that in time we see lots of these types of vessels start up again. — Sam Devlin

The Kokanee 36 is available as study plans, and as a custom build from Devlin Boats. Contact Sam if you would like to see this design developed.

Kokanee36Side

Kokanee 36 Specifications

Length 36 ft. – 0 in.
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