Pelicano 20

Adeline at the dock

With the Pelicano 20, Sam has pulled his usual trick of combining a lot of usability into a very convenient and lovely boat-shaped package. It started as a custom build, which resulted in the Adeline. You can read the customer’s experiences with his Pelicano 20 here.

The Pelicano Bassboat is an excellent choice for anyone who wants to maximize usability in a 20′-2″cruiser. It’s a traditional speedboat, a fishing boat, and versatile explorer for weekends on the water. The design has a spacious cabin forward, with enough space for a v-berth for the occasional camping weekend.  The design has ample dry storage below.

Like all Pelicanos, the maximum HP is 115, and you can realistically expect over 40mph with that kind of power.

At 20′-2″, it not hard to find a garage that will store the Pelicano for the winter, which gives owners more options and saves money.

And finally, the Pelicano is an easily trailerable design, adding to its basic versatility, and helping you to find your own boating adventures.

The Pelicano 20 is currently available as study plans. The full construction plans and a CNC cut hull kit will be available in mid-June 2017.

Adeline Sea Trials

Pelicano 20 Specifications

Length 20 ft. –  2 in.
Beam 7 ft. – 5 in.
Draft 10 in.
Power Outboard (115hp max)
Displacement 2300 lbs.

Adeline float

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Blue Fin 54

Sam designs in groups in his ongoing quest for unbelievable flexibility in boat design. The Blue Fin 54 is an adaption of the Blue Fin 48, which you should check out for the thought process behind her design. In the 54 variant, you keep the stunning efficiency and add more space and comfort, while keeping the fuel economy and designed-in ability to smooth out choppy waters. Sam has designed a single and twin screw version. The twin screw version offers a bit more performance and the ability to use the twin configuration for maneuverability in tight situations. The single screw version offers amazing efficiency for going the distance with minimal fuel burn. Our friend Temur Rukhaya has not only completed a sterling build of this design, he has given us real world data on the outcome of fuel efficiency. Read about Temur’s build here. Get the study plans here. Get the free poster here.

 

RPM Speed (knots) Fuel Consumption (l/h) Fuel Consumption (g/h)
750 5.1 5 1.32
1000 6.5 5.5 1.45
1100 7.0 7.2 1.90
1200 7.8 7.4 1.95
1300 8.4 7.4 1.95
1400 9.2 8.4 2.22
1500 9.7 9.5 2.51
1600 10.4 11.6 3.06
1700 10.8 14.6 3.86
1800 11.4 15.8 4.17
1900 12.0 17.4 4.60
2000 12.8 26 6.87
2300 15.3
2400 16.1
2500 16.8


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New Penny – Marsh Wren Gaff Sloop – 2017

It would be safe to call the Marsh Wren an evolutionary design in the Devlin catalog. She’s a refined synthesis of a long history of sailboat design in a form that is small enough for convenience and large enough for an entire family as a daysailer. In cabin form, she’s capable of longer cruises. In either form, the Marsh Wren is  a well balanced and efficient sailboat, light on the helm and easy to handle alone.

The Marsh Wren is the response to a body of customer feedback. Read about it in Sam’s design notes.

The New Penny is a fantastic build of an evolved design from Devlin Boats. It  can take you almost anywhere one efficient sail power. The asking price is $49,900. Contact Sam for more information or to arrange a showing.

Contact information is at the bottom of every page.

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GooseLodge II – Surf Runner 25 – 2004

GooselodgeII

Inspired by customers Larry and Wendy Brown, the Surf Runner 25 combines the classic looks from another time with modern performance and reliability. She looks like an open runabout from the outside, but manages to sneak some very usable cabin space into the bow area. A bespoke bimini top also provides shelter to the skipper and crew when the weather is less than perfect, as is often the case here in the Puget Sound. A Volvo-Penta sterndrive diesel provides plenty of thrust to run at 25 knots with a good economical cruise at 20 knots. The speed envelope is part of the design. Slow enough to avoid typical Puget Sound flotsam and fast enough to devour the miles. The responsive hull is designed to cut through the waves, keeping the pounding to a minimum and the comfort levels to the max. A plethora of smart storage and configurable seating rounds out a boat that is easy to bring into your life.

The GooseLodge II was buillt in 2004 by the crack team at Devlin Boats. She has recently been refurbished to look and run like new. The asking price is $119,500. Contact Sam for more information or to arrange a showing.

Contact information is at the bottom of every page.

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Millie Hill 28

MillieHill28RenderHelmA good friend and boatbuilder in Korea commissioned this design. It followed some correspondence that we had about a preliminary design on the same concept done originally in 25ft. of length with a 10ft. beam but we quickly realized that if we really intended this to be a potential live aboard “Shanty Boat”, that some extra length and beam would pay dividends and give us much more room to work and live with and we quickly landed on this 28 ft x 12 ft version.

This idea of a “Shanty Boat’ is a beguiling one that holds many hours of musings and dreams in its web;  the concept of doing a vessel that is commodious enough to really be comfortable as a live-aboard and one that could be moved from place to place either by water or by land as she is still of a size that a good flatbed trailer could move her about with ease.  Imagine all the different adventures that we might have with her, perhaps starting down the Mississippi River, stopping for any length of time in all the interesting spots you discover, anchoring when privacy is desired and stopping MillieHill28RenderGalleyperiodically at marinas to pick up enough supplies to keep us in food and drinks.  With the proper sized outboard, she could actually move-about under her own power enough to justify the expense and mess of rigging a control station. But a real salt would match her with a small tug (something like one of our Godzilla 22 or 25ft. models) and tow her about, using the tug like the car/pickup that all conventional landlocked campers have.  Anchor in some secluded little bight in the waterway and use the tug to go to town re-stocking the larder or perhaps just for a break and a meal.  Return to the mother ship and you’ve got your home intact and waiting patiently for you.

She has a good amount of space on her covered rear deck. This deck is at a lower level closer to the waterline which helps make boarding and exiting the boat easier and also allows us to sit in the shade on a warm day.  If you fancy doing a bit of sunning, you’ve got a couple of options — either the fore-deck or it wouldn’t be all that difficult to climb up onto the foreward cabin top for a view of the world that would be unmatched.

MillieHill28RenderRoof

MillieHill28RenderSalonBut it is the cabin with its volume and spaces that really is the attraction of this boat with all the functions of a normal home — kitchen, bath, lounging, sleeping, stowage, bookshelves and entertainment center.  If you really fancy living off the grid, a simple little gas or diesel generator could be fitted that would allow her to be fully functional and self-contained, but she also would be fitted with shore power connections that allows you to hook up to electrical at the marina.  It is also simple to hook up to marina pressure water making her a completely functional floating home.  The Millie Hill 28 has a full sized queen bed that can be arranged in a couple of ways and with both sides of the bed accessible, it’s ready to crawl into easily and comfortably.  There is a full dinette that can seat 4 adults for a meal and with the opposing seat/couch, you can find yourself with a couple of possibilities for settling in for the evening. Stowage is built into the bases of these seating areas, always with the thought in mind that there seems to never be enough space for MillieHill28RenderPlanstowage on a boat.  There are little bonus areas also — a computer desk on the starboard side that allows a space for this very vital function of modern life and a hanging locker on the port side.  There is a shower in the head compartment and if desired, there’s even room for an all-in-one washer/dryer to be fitted into the underside of the linen stowage area in the head.  Virtually every function of the normal home can be accommodated but most importantly, you can move the Millie Hill to wherever you desire which is really the key to this platform.  There might be many hundreds of options of how you configure your own interior or set her up but the footprint of a bi-level cabin, with boarding area in the stern and the possibility of moving her about either under her own power or with a tug tow, is not to be understated.

Plans are available for $225 dollars and we have both Metric or Imperial measurement versions. — Sam Devlin

The Millie Hill 28 is available in study and construction plans, and as a custom build from Sam and his team.

MillieHill28RenderProfileMillieHill28PlanMillieHill28Profile

Millie Hill 28 Specifications

Length 38 ft. – 5 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 13 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 14000 lbs.
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Czarinna 30

Czarinna30ErieCanalShe is a very traditional looking yacht with a plumb bow and a fantail stern forming the ends of an easily driven hull. Her forward pilothouse meshes nicely with a large beamy main salon aft of the helm/galley area. Comfort underway is of main importance here with 6’4″ head room in the main salon. Four large opening windows in the salon area are set to perfect viewing height while seated in the salon. There is also a large 24″ x 36″ hatch/skylight on the salon cabin top which hinges upward for ventilation.

The head is on the starboard side, at the aft end of the main salon. With the water closet and a remarkable Pullman-style sink/wash basin that folds onto the bulkhead, this head compartment can convert into a shower stall for longer cruises.

A solid-fuel heater is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the head. In winter, the boat is warm and dry without the sweating and mildew problems normally associated with most boats in today’s market. In the summer, the feeling in the main salon is like sitting in a large screened porch. Both settees are 68″ long and double as berths. There is a folding leaf table which can accommodate anything from casual drinks to formal dining for four.

Forward of the main salon is the raised pilothouse with port and starboard helm seats and galley space aft on both sides. Refrigeration tucks neatly below the companion helm seat and there is stowage on both sides under the counters. A propane stove allows the cook to enjoy the ride in the pilothouse with excellent visibility and full 72″ headroom. Forward in the fo’c’sle, accessible through a hinged hatch, is a large berth and storage area. This can be a private suite or out-of-the-way storage.

The twin 18 hp YANMAR diesels will cruise Czarinna at 7 knots at 1900 RPM. Czarinna30LateThe noise, vibration and smell normally associated with high speed boats just doesn’t develop on Czarinna. Each engine is tucked out of the way, under the settees, port and starboard, in a sound insulated seat compartment. Fuel consumption is very economical, two-thirds of a gallon of diesel per hour, at her cruising speed of 7 knots. It’s hard to imagine cruising more economically than this these days.

— Sam Devlin

The Czarinna 30 is available in study and full construction plans, and as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

Czarinna30PlanCzarinna30Profile

Czarinna 30 Specifications

Length 29 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 30 in.
Power Inboard diesel twin 18hp
Displacement 8900 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Speed 7 knot cruise
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Pyladian 31

Many of you faithful readers might remember the “Storm Petrel”, a 33ft. Lobster-type boat that we built several years ago, and the “Pyladian” is an evolution and direct sister to that design. With the perspective of about 5 years between the two building projects and with a chance to spend many happy hours bugging about in the Salish Sea in the Storm Petrel, I found her to be, in my opinion, one of the best performing sea-boats that I have ever had the pleasure of running. I remember heading north with my good friend George Gray (currently living with his wife on their sailboat and cruising the lovely waters of Mexico) to the Anacortes Trawler Fest show several years ago. It was a boisterous day with brisk winds of 25-30 knots coming out of the Southwest. With the fetch of Puget Sound and the short steep chop that can develop in those waters, it was a good test of what the Storm Petrel could do. With the following seas and our trying to maintain a pace of 16 plus knots of speed, the Storm Petrel would bound over the top of the crest of one wave and then pitch downward into the trough between the seas burying her bow into the wave just ahead of us till we could see water squirting up thru the anchor roller forward. Without slowing or slewing around in any way, she would then climb at the same speed up the face of the next wave reaching the top before pitching down again into the trough of the next. After about 30 minutes of this exhilarating ride, I remarked to George something about my amazement of such a remarkable ride to which he replied that he was impressed also. We chatted for a few more minutes about her amazing performance and no sooner had the words come out of my mouth, “we should turn around and try her head into the wind”, when I started turning the wheel. We did a good 15 minutes in reverse direction straight into the eye of the wind and those cresting waves with essentially the same results. The boat didn’t slow down and certainly didn’t broach or slew at the bottom of the troughs even when burying her nose deeply into the waves. Really, all in all, she showed remarkable capability for those seas, an incredibly pleasant boat to run on a day when I would normally wish I was home reading a good book by a warm fire. This combination of fine bow lines and entry with her broad and flat exit of run of the hull was literally the perfect example of what one would wish for in this type of boat.

So after some years, along came a new candidate for a boat, this time a couple that was looking for a commuter boat to run from Vancouver Island, specifically Sydney, British Columbia, to their island home located about 34 miles north in the Canadian Gulf Islands. They needed her to be able to make good and economical speed so that they could spend their time on the island not just going back and forth to it. The boat needed to be able to handle anything from a few groceries to large units of wood, fuel, and all the myriad of items necessary for comfortable island life. The weather would not always be compatible to this lifestyle and so the vessel would need to be able to handle the weather in whatever form that would be presented to it.

With those requirements set down, I had no hesitation in recommending the Storm Petrel type hull as a good model to choose from. But the customers wanted a single diesel (not the twin diesels that the Storm Petrel had) and needed the potential for more speed than the Storm Petrel boat had so the Yanmar 6LPA was chosen. With 300 horses under her engine box, the hull should top speed out at about 26-28 knots and cruise at 20 knots without difficulty. With the single diesel layout, the cabin changes considerably in its layout and in the potential layout options for the customers. De-emphasized was the need for berthing and a galley with those being way down on the list of priorities and moving up on the list was the need for handling tough waters at all times of the year and keeping a load of people warm and dry while being transported to the island for a visit.

Her overall size was limited to 30ft-6in on deck in order to fit her slip where she will be kept in Sydney and a bow thruster was added to couple with the single engine and give the owner greater control in a tight docking situation. A single seat was added across the stern of the boat for passengers on those nice sunny days but the rest of the cockpit was kept as open as possible to carry gear and stores. The final change was to slightly contemporize her appearance with a three pane forward windshield and twin sliding windows on each of her cabin sides. She is certainly no traditional appearing lobsterboat like the Storm Petrel was but I really have to say that I like the profile of this new “Pyladian” very much and look forward to seeing how her presence manifests itself on the water. Launching is expected in the late fall of 2013. – Sam Devlin

The Pyladian 31 is available as a custom build from Sam Devlin and his team.

Pyladian31PlanPyladian31Profile

Pyladian 31 Specifications

Length 30 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 31 in.
Power Inboard diesel 300hp
Displacement 9200 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Speed 20 knot cruise/28 knot max

 

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Amak Tugboats

Amak 44 Cabin
Amak 44 Cabin

Tugboats have been a long standing theme in my life and I started my tug-affliction at an early age.  When I was in kindergarten at the age of 5, I won an art competition with a tugboat composition and even though the medium was smeary crayon, it showed some promise of tug-work in my design quiver even at that young phase of my life.  During my college years, I worked on several different tugs in Alaska, saving my money and helping to grubstake me thru school at the University of Oregon.  The very first tug that I worked on was named the ‘Amak’ and a fine example of the type she was, home ported in Ketchikan, Alaska and as I recall, built in the late 1890s. She was wood, of course, nicely detailed (though she was a working tug), had a Cat diesel engine and after just a few days on board, I was hooked.  The ‘Amak’ was to change my life. I read issue #1 of WoodenBoat magazine onboard her and made up my mind that boats, indeed wooden boats, were to be my life choice of hobby, avocation, passion, and career.

To celebrate the spirit of that first tug, I have named these models, in all their sizes, the ‘Amak’ series and I tell you this, in all confidence, that if my ship ever comes in and I reach a time in my life when I want to slow down just a bit, I would like to build one of these boats and do a bit more tugging myself.  You can look at the designs and dream all the modifications you might want but always keep in mind that a tug needs quite a bit of weight, a big screw (propeller), and some old style horsepower to keep her happy. Enjoy!  — Sam Devlin

The entire series is available in study plans. Contact Sam to develop your custom dream tugboat.

Amak 26
Amak 26

Amak 26 Specifications

Length on Deck 26 ft. – 3 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 39 in.
Power Inboard diesel 30-100hp
Displacement 9000 lbs.
Amak 32
Amak 32

Amak 32 Specifications

Length on Deck 32 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 10 in.
Draft 44 in.
Power Inboard diesel 50-100hp
Displacement 18000 lbs.
Amak 38
Amak 38

Amak 38 Specifications

Length on Deck 37 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 4 in.
Draft 50 in.
Power Inboard diesel 120-250hp
Displacement 33000 lbs.
Amak 44
Amak 44
Amak 44 Deck Plan
Amak 44 Deck Plan

Amak 44 Specifications

Length on Deck 43 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 14 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 69 in.
Power Inboard diesel 200-350hp
Displacement 45000 lbs.
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Surf Runner 27

SurfRunner27FAThe Surf Runner 27 begins with the performance runabout (with cabin and berth tucked in) and extends it a couple of feet. What a difference those two feet make on a boat this size! The runabout style can extend into a pilothouse for rainy days, and the boat can sprout a flying bridge for those great views and the wind in your face when the sun is out and the air is warm. The diesel stern drive can maintain the performance of her smaller sibling without sacrificing the tight handling and smooth passage through the chop. If you need a little more space on a boat that is still conveniently trailerable, this may be a design that speaks to you.

Contact Sam if you would like to develop the Surf Runner 27 into the perfect boat for you.

SurfRunner27PlanSurfRunner27SurfRunner27FBPlanSurfRunner27FBSide

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Moon River 48

MoonRiver48RunningBowI am happy to report the launching and sea-trials are completed on the newest of the Devlin fleet — the “Moon River 48” and she is living up to all our expectations and dreams. She runs thru the water with an amazing grace, cutting thru the waves like there is nothing in her way. She is smooth and powerful on the water and with her twin John Deere engines purring away quietly in the cockpit, there is an almost dreamlike quality to her motion thru the water.

Top speed with the twin John Deere 315 hp Diesel engines is 23 knots at 80% of the power curve. That means she has a bit more speed potential in her but she would need to be operated above the 80% line and most boats don’t get run that hard. Cruising speed of 18 knots is easy, smooth, and quiet with the engines just sipping at fuel and you really think you’re moving at a slow pace but if you look aft, you can see she is marching along at a much faster rate.

She is also very docile around the docks and in tight quarters as she has the maneuvering ability of her twin screws to help the skipper out and with proportional bow and stern thrusters, you can really make her do virtually anything that you need. The 360 visibility from the helm is extraordinary and with tiny little adjustments to either the props or thrusters, it really is a low stress way to be on the water. One of the great virtues of a sedan type cruiser like the Moon River 48 is that the windage is low — there is plenty of boat in the water and not so much area above the water that the wind can push on. Really, she is a very pleasant boat to use.

MoonRiver48ParkSo let’s take a written tour through her and see what she has for space and accommodations. There is a floatational swim step on her rear with the level being just perfect for stepping onto the boat from a dock or from a dingy. There is mid-calf height 2” diameter stainless steel railings (staples) on the back of the swim step to help keep you centered but this is a 36” wide step and there is no lack of room or any feeling of insecurity when you step aboard. The cockpit is entered thru a door that hinges on the back of the transom and stepping up into the self-bailing cockpit is easy and secure. Stepping up into the cockpit you will notice the large cockpit area is half covered with a roof extension of the house with a couple of wide seats in the immediate back of the cockpit that allow the sun worshipers to stay happy and two almost 7ft. long seats port and starboard under cover of the roof extension for those passengers preferring shade. These covered seats are really the tops of the two engine boxes and with electric motors to raise them it is just the matter of pressing a couple of rocker switches and the engines are exposed. Between the engine box seats on the centerline cockpit sole is a flush hatch that if opened exposes a larger area between the engines. All access for checking oil, checking the water strainers, changing oil, and shifting fuel from one tank to another is done from this area. There is a ladder leading into it and everything is here from tool box stowage to spare oil soak rags, right at hand and well lit from a total of 8 lights — easy to get into and back out.

Moving forward is the centerline door to the main cabin with the galley immediately to the starboard side of the boat and on the port side is a large bureau top cabinet with hatch and door in it. This is the access to the second stateroom and by opening the hatch and swinging open the door, a ladder can access this area. There is a generous berth outboard in the space, locker room for duffels and hanging clothes and just below the cabin sole on the centerline of the boat is another single berth. This aft stateroom has a generous almost 7ft. headroom and is painted in white paint with mahogany wood trim and it looks clean and comfortable. Ventilation is provided by a larger hatch that opens into the cockpit of the boat just above the top of the engine box. There is also access to the main systems area of the boat either from the single berth under the centerline or thru another flush hatch in the main sole of the salon. Located in this space are the pumps for potable water, blackwater pumps, centerline water tank, inverter, Glendinning shore power cord basket, battery charger and more. This space is well lighted and completely finished with our traditional Devlin finishes. In fact, one of the things that we are most known for is our finishes with every part of the boat being an example of our simple but elegant finishes with all construction done to the highest level of quality and finish.

Back up in the main salon, the galley is to the starboard side and has the shape of a large “U” — the freezer and refrigerator are below counter, drawer type units and a trash compactor, sink, and a 4 burner range with oven complete the suit plus there are gobs of drawers for dish, silverware, pots, pans and all the other items a modern boat need to stow away. All drawers have sea-locks on them — simple swiveling tabs that lock the drawer into closed position and hold tight even in a tough sea-way. Opposite the galley is a “U” shaped dinette that can seat up to six with comfort with a varnished table of Bubinga wood that finishes out the dining area. Forward of the settee is the co/helm seat with the back being convertible from either the use for the settee or the use for the co/helm. Electronic instruments are on both the helm and the co/helm sides with the co/helm person able to help monitor the progress of the vessel or scout ahead for safe anchorages or obstacles. Lots of counter space behind the front windows allows the spreading out of charts or tide tables while underway. On the starboard side is a large helm area with full instrumentation and a helm seat that can actually seat two side by side if desired. More drawers and stowage spaces are festooned around the helm and co/helm area providing organized stowage of all items.

On the subject of ventilation, there are all-together 11 opening windows and hatches in the main salon/pilothouse of the Moon River not counting the main companionway door itself so it’s very easy to be comfortable and cool in this vessel either underway or at anchor or tied up to a dock.

Going down 4 steps into the focsle of the Moon River, you see the master head to starboard with full shower stall and on the port side an almost mirror image of the master head except for the shower stall for the crew. The doors to the two heads are arranged to be convenient to either using from the main salon for the crew and for using from the master stateroom up in the bows of the boat for the master head. A large door leads into the master stateroom forward with full island style queen sized berth forward and hanging lockers port and starboard for both the skipper and for the first mate. This is a spacious and light and airy feeling cabin with beautiful Alaska Yellow Cedar tongue and groove overhead and Yellow Cedar and Mahogany trim for all doors, drawers, fiddle, deck beams etc. The forward stateroom also has a large 28”x28” hatch in the ceiling with screen system on it for privacy.

Clear up forward ahead of the queen sized berth is the chain locker — it’s divided into two sides and the Moon River can carry 150 ft. of chain and 250 ft. of line anchor rode. Immediately above is a Lofrans anchor windlass and deck wash system.

This finishes our tour of the boat except to mention that there are strong welded type 316 stainless steel railings protecting the crew moving forward onto the foredeck and handrails and ladder to get to the roof top. Clear up on top of the Moon River is a Nick Jackson electric davit that has capacity to lift a 1,200 lb. tender onboard. Stainless steel dingy feet complete the vessel and with good access to the roof-top, the Moon River completes the test for a fine cruising vessel.

Build time on the first of these was just over 19,000 hours, an almost staggering figure in this mass-produced world that we live in these days. But it is a testament to the trust that our customers have in our craft that allows us to build a vessel like the Moon River. When you work on a project like this, it is quickly realized that there is something special about working with your hands, and your brain and building, indeed breathing life, into a vessel like her. Thanks to all for the effort and the chance to bring Moon River to the water. – Sam Devlin

The Moon River is available as study plans and as a custom build from Sam and his team.

MoonRiver48PlanModel

Moon River 48 Specifications

Length 47 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 13 ft. – 8 in.
Draft 40 in.
Power Inboard diesel, twin 315hp
Displacement 32000 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Speed 18 knots cruise @4.4gph/23 knots max
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