Sam’s Sockeye 62 Article in Soundings

Sam has been writing a series of articles for Soundings magazine. Collectively, they are entitled “Sketchbook” and he spends time writing about the designs he has dreamed up –  in many cases highly developed plans are drawn – but for numerous reasons, these designs remain on the drawing board. They could be summed as the peak of a 40 year career in boat design, but I’d bet Sam wouldn’t give himself that much credit.

The latest article just appeared in the June 12 issue. It reveals Sam’s work on a 62-foot version of his venerable Sockeye design. It’s a true long-range cruiser drawn on the lines of oceangoing trawlers of decades past, but bringing all the advantages of his stitch-and-glue technology along for the ride.

As with all things Sam Devlin, and with the sheer amount of space on offer, the Sockeye 62 can be fitted out in any number of ways to meet your dreams of a boat that will literally take you anywhere on the water in supreme comfort and yes, style.  Check out the Soundings article: http://www.devlinboat.com/sockeye62/

Check out the updated drawings on the main Sockeye 62 catalog page.

 

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Sketchbook 7-28-16 #1

Shearwater 38 M.S.

Length 37’-8”
Beam 12’-2”
Draft 48”
Disp. Est. 28,000 lbs.
Sail Area 248 total

I wandered across the Shearwater 38 design in my files today and spent a few hours working on a true motorsailer version of it. This drawing and its weight of customer input (in this case my own dreams) is tempered by a spring cruise that we did this year on our venerable old Fishing Troller the ‘Josephine’ and a really tough and rough crossing of the Straits of Georgia trying to get over to Nanaimo B.C. before the marine stores closed for the weekend (i.e. chasing some electrical parts that were threatening to spoil our trip). I should have stopped for the afternoon and finished travelling across the Strait Saturday morning, but I bet that the opposing wind and tide conditions in the straits would soften a bit once the tide changed to an ebb sometime around 2pm. I certainly missed that bet and conditions worsened considerably with the tide change leaving me in what some would categorize as true survival conditions. Suffice it to say that the highest speed we could manage in the seas and winds was a very slow 4 knots over the bottom and could only approach the short and steep chop at a 45 degree angle that tended to geometrically lengthen the crests between each wave set. If I allowed Josephine to work the seas on her own at the 45 degree angle it was breath-taking in its scary complex of conditions, but if I viewed out the port side looking out into the wave’s squarely I truly had to control my breathing. This was not my idea of fun at the tail end of what had been up to that time a very good early spring cruise north.

Shearwater38sketch2
So back to my design, the sail panels are very small, for two reasons the first of which is to make the panels so manageable that I would actually raise the sails rather than leave them flaked on the booms. The second reason is that when running in conditions like the ones we found in the Straits of Georgia this spring I could keep the sail panels up, helping soften the buffeting of the waves on my hull, minimizing the extreme motion the waves imparted to the vessel and helping my diesel engine drive the boat in conditions that would gray the hair of a normal mortal. So with this reduced rig I can fantasize even about cruising in high-latitude waters and still keep myself and the boat intact and seaworthy. Take a look and maybe you might agree with me that a snug and tough inboard rig, a proper diesel engine in the bilge, my best mate in a comfortable seat nearby and some of the those out of body moments experienced on days when all others dare to venture! Enjoy.

Shearwater38sketch

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Sketchbook 7-26-16 Design#2

Sockeye for 7-footer

Sockeye 63-7

Length 63’-6”
Beam 18’-6”
Draft 6’-7”
Disp. Est. 86,000

 
A very pleasant Sunday afternoon phone conversation with ‘Jeff’ a prospective boat buyer very soon outlined a potential problem with the design that he was interested in. You see Jeff is 7ft. tall and while I design my boats for tall people the 7ft. height is really off the radar for most design projects unless specifically needed or requested by the design customer. Simple design modifications can be done to an existing design to a point but sometimes you really need to think out of the box to accommodate the customer and their very specific requirements and needs.

After hanging up the phone I simply couldn’t put this one away in my mind and so spent the next couple of hours modifying another similar design to fit Jeff’s unique height requirements. In this drawing the cockpit has a 7ft occupant included for scale, all interior headroom’s are In the 7’-4” range including the forward cabin area.

Just a bit of glimpse into the life of an inveterate boat sketcher and designer’s life, this one wrapped around a warm and sunny Sunday afternoon.

Sockeye for 7-footer

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Oysta 62

What can I say? I am smitten by the profile and use of these aft house cruisers, evoking for me the same emotion as looking at the Halibut Schooners that have fished the North Pacific for more than 100 years. These are very seaworthy boats capable of holding their own in just about any conditions the sea can dish out. The Oysta 62/Annie was designed in 2001 for the customer of the first of our Sockeye series powerboats. His family was expanding with a new marriage and he started down the path of dreaming about a boat that could handle this pack. Part of his dream was the lifelong goal to cruise to high-latitudes places with comfort and safety.

Let’s take a good look over the interior of this design. Starting from aft, you’ll find a giant aft-owners cabin complete with desk, full head/shower, an island queen sized bed, and enough room around the bed to be able to make it up in the morning without being a gymnast. Going up the staircase into the pilothouse, there is room for a proper charting area, separate double watch chairs, a dinette seating area, etc. Double doors on both sides of the pilothouse give access to the deck and the working area of the boat.

From the pilothouse going down a staircase on the port side, the galley, a true dinette area, and laundry are accessed. Lots of room to do all the chores that keep a boat and crew clean and well fed can happen here. Access to the engine room is done thru a large door at the aft end of this compartment. There is stand up room around the large single screw diesel engine, the fuel tanks are port and starboard in the shoulders of the engine room, and fuel management is easy and organized. Double generators round out the engine room with a 6kw providing backup to the 20kw main.

From the Galley/Dinette cabin, access to the Focsle is done up a few steps and there are two primary staterooms accessed in the bow. The Skipper’s cabin is to starboard with a double berth and a desk and locker area. Clear up in the bows of the boat are stacked double berths, port and starboard, and a diesel bulkhead heater keeps this whole area warm and dry. There is a very large head to port with full shower for keeping the crew clean and neat. Up a winding staircase is access to the foredeck of the boat allowing crew to exit both up directly to the deck or aft thru the galley/dinette cabin.

The rig, if set up on the Oysta 62, would be a large ketch rig set on aluminum spars. For my money, I would put a gaff on the mainsail keeping the mast lower and the whole center of gravity of the rig as low as possible. This is a true motorsailor with the rig only providing assistance to the engine and it is good to keep the sail areas down small enough that they will get set quickly and easily. Once one gets into the Tradewinds, the engine can just purr along with the assistance of the sails and the motion of the boat is easy and nice with the range being something North of 3,000 nautical miles.

Imagine an evening, with the anchor set hours ago, in some very secluded holding ground very far away from the maddening rest of the world. The crew has all gathered down in the galley/dinette. It’s shirt sleeves now with a bit of residual heat emanating from the nearby engine room and the huge diesel range/oven in the galley. There is a bottle of good rum on the table and glasses are being emptied to the accompaniment of lots of laughter mixed with good stories, music, and a brisk game of Mexican Train dominos spread out on the huge dinette table. With good friends at your elbow, mix in a bit of smoke from fragrant Cuban cigars broke out for the occasion and realize that life does not get any better than this! – Sam Devlin

The Oysta 62 is available as study plans, but this one really begs for a call to Sam, just in case you want to land a helicopter on it.

Oysta62planOysta62profile

Oysta 62 Specifications

Length 60 ft. – 9 in.
Beam 16 ft. – 4 in.
Draft 81 in.
Power Inboard diesel 285-425hp
Displacement 78000 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
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Oysta 52

Oysta52PlanBothA design that we are working on this spring of 2008 and I have great hopes of this being the next large boat for us to build in our shop. The customer came to me with a rather unusual request of a long-distance trawler capable of passages in any waters at any time of the year, especially hi-latitude type conditions. For those of you not versed in the disciplines of geography, the definition of hi-latitude is cruising in the far north Arctic and the far south Antarctic regions. A crew of two would be all that is required to handle her in those conditions but she needed to be able to carry several passengers with comfort to those remote waters.

It’s going to be very interesting to see how this design evolves. The customer has a background of working in Alaska on tug and fishing boats in the early 1970s, experience very similar to mine, and our evolved boating “eyes” are very much alike.

She is very much a blown-up and enlarged Sockeye 45 type of hull, much deeper and heavier of course, but with the same fantail stern that I am so fond of. Her pilothouse is medium-sized and placed further aft and it has a great flying bridge for piloting the boat when visibility is of the greatest importance. The galley is below down in the fo’c’sle area and there is room in the pilothouse for the entire crew to sit in warm, protected comfort. Keep an eye out for updates to this design as I work on it… — Sam Devlin

 

Oysta52planLowerOysta52Side

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Golly Wobbler 38

GollyWobbler38HarborHere is a power trawler of a size large enough to spend a lot of time on cruising or even living aboard yet handy enough so that a couple can easily handle her in any conditions she might encounter. With a high visibility pilothouse and a covered after deck, it’s clear to see her Northwest heritage. This could easily be the boat to cruise comfortably to Alaska and back or just knock around Puget Sound. We have chosen a hull that performs very well with medium horsepower and put steady economical miles under her keel without needing a fuel barge to link up with her every few hours. Power is to be Volvo-Penta’s 41 series diesel of 185 hp. with fuel consumption of about 4 gallons per hour, a cruising speed of 10 knots, and a top speed of 13 knots. With a single diesel for her main power plant, dockside maneuvering will be aided by an electric bow thruster. The engine room is below the pilothouse sole and can be accessed through a door in the fo’c’sle or through lift up hatches in the pilothouse floor. Fuel tanks are port and starboard in the engine room under the side decks and the whole space is sound insulated and brightly lit so that maintenance can be as comfortable and convenient as possible.

GollyWobbler38SeatingWalking into the boat from the covered cockpit, the galley is to port with a good sized refrigerator and bar to starboard. Dinette to port and settee to starboard allow a good sized group of people to converse or lounge without feeling like they are getting in each others way. Up a couple of steps to the pilothouse, here one encounters a large, bright and should I say “shippy” feeling bridge. To port, there is a long chart table area with enough work room to suit most any ship. The helm is to starboard with a shoulder tall locker to stow oilskins and heavy winter coats for year round cruising. Extra seating in the bridge area can be handled by swiveling captain’s chairs with the main idea being to keep this area as flexible and shipshape as possible. There is 360 degree visibility from the bridge and docking is easily handled with a side sliding door to starboard and a simple single step out to the side deck.

GoGollyWobbler38Galleying forward into the fo’c’sle, you will encounter a head to port with enough room to maneuver in without feeling cramped. There is a separate shower stall and both the head compartment and shower drain into a separate sump. Cleaning is largely as easy as hosing them out with hand held rinse spigots. There is a quarter berth to starboard for that occasional guest that might come along for a cruise. Forward of the quarter berth is a hanging locker and a vanity or personal work desk on the starboard side. Forward is a large double berth and a couple of reading seats. I favor the concept of providing plenty of nesting spots so to allow one the opportunity to relax in quiet seclusion when its needed. The Gollywobbler has been designed with that in mind.

GollyWobbler38EngineConstruction will be Wood/Epoxy Composite using Devlin’s Stitch and Glue method. This construction yields a beautiful boat that is warm and insulated due to the wood hull and structure and yet as maintainable as any of the plastic fantastics you might find coming out of the large production yards. The beauty of building a boat with this method and construction technique is that the “Gollywobbler” doesn’t have to be designed for a large mass audience and can be custom built to each owners desires and needs. — Sam Devlin

The Golly Wobbler 38 is available as study plans and as a custom build from Devlin Boats. Talk to Sam about your dreams for a large power cruiser.

GollyWobbler38SideGollyWobbler38Top

 

Golly Wobbler 38 Specifications

Length 38 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 38 in.
Power Inboard diesel 185hp
Displacement 18000 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
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