Oysta 62

What can I say? I am smitten by the profile and use of these aft house cruisers, evoking for me the same emotion as looking at the Halibut Schooners that have fished the North Pacific for more than 100 years. These are very seaworthy boats capable of holding their own in just about any conditions the sea can dish out. The Oysta 62/Annie was designed in 2001 for the customer of the first of our Sockeye series powerboats. His family was expanding with a new marriage and he started down the path of dreaming about a boat that could handle this pack. Part of his dream was the lifelong goal to cruise to high-latitudes places with comfort and safety.

Let’s take a good look over the interior of this design. Starting from aft, you’ll find a giant aft-owners cabin complete with desk, full head/shower, an island queen sized bed, and enough room around the bed to be able to make it up in the morning without being a gymnast. Going up the staircase into the pilothouse, there is room for a proper charting area, separate double watch chairs, a dinette seating area, etc. Double doors on both sides of the pilothouse give access to the deck and the working area of the boat.

From the pilothouse going down a staircase on the port side, the galley, a true dinette area, and laundry are accessed. Lots of room to do all the chores that keep a boat and crew clean and well fed can happen here. Access to the engine room is done thru a large door at the aft end of this compartment. There is stand up room around the large single screw diesel engine, the fuel tanks are port and starboard in the shoulders of the engine room, and fuel management is easy and organized. Double generators round out the engine room with a 6kw providing backup to the 20kw main.

From the Galley/Dinette cabin, access to the Focsle is done up a few steps and there are two primary staterooms accessed in the bow. The Skipper’s cabin is to starboard with a double berth and a desk and locker area. Clear up in the bows of the boat are stacked double berths, port and starboard, and a diesel bulkhead heater keeps this whole area warm and dry. There is a very large head to port with full shower for keeping the crew clean and neat. Up a winding staircase is access to the foredeck of the boat allowing crew to exit both up directly to the deck or aft thru the galley/dinette cabin.

The rig, if set up on the Oysta 62, would be a large ketch rig set on aluminum spars. For my money, I would put a gaff on the mainsail keeping the mast lower and the whole center of gravity of the rig as low as possible. This is a true motorsailor with the rig only providing assistance to the engine and it is good to keep the sail areas down small enough that they will get set quickly and easily. Once one gets into the Tradewinds, the engine can just purr along with the assistance of the sails and the motion of the boat is easy and nice with the range being something North of 3,000 nautical miles.

Imagine an evening, with the anchor set hours ago, in some very secluded holding ground very far away from the maddening rest of the world. The crew has all gathered down in the galley/dinette. It’s shirt sleeves now with a bit of residual heat emanating from the nearby engine room and the huge diesel range/oven in the galley. There is a bottle of good rum on the table and glasses are being emptied to the accompaniment of lots of laughter mixed with good stories, music, and a brisk game of Mexican Train dominos spread out on the huge dinette table. With good friends at your elbow, mix in a bit of smoke from fragrant Cuban cigars broke out for the occasion and realize that life does not get any better than this! – Sam Devlin

The Oysta 62 is available as study plans, but this one really begs for a call to Sam, just in case you want to land a helicopter on it.

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Oysta 62 Specifications

Length 60 ft. – 9 in.
Beam 16 ft. – 4 in.
Draft 81 in.
Power Inboard diesel 285-425hp
Displacement 78000 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
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Oysta 42

Oysta42SideA problem many boaters have is the unequal interests of their spouses in their real or imagined cruising adventures and, most specifically in “sailing” cruising adventures. Along came an East Coast customer who wished to spend the second half of his life with his wife continuing as his partner. It’s always a ticklish design issue, attempting to make a boat comfortable and unique enough to hold the interest of a less-than-eager spouse, yet capable and challenging enough to hold the interest and enthusiasm of the more experienced partner.

The Oysta 42 was specified to be a “motor sailer.” And not just a sailboat with an auxiliary engine. The Oysta 42 is a true 50/50 motor sailer capable of motoring through any sea condition; with the sail-assist it’s capable of doubling its useful cruising range from 1500 miles under power alone to better-than-3,000 miles with sail. And keeping an engine running affords a lot of comfort and luxury on board, while sail alone might work against the less willing crew member’s enthusiasm. An inboard low aspect ratio ketch rig was chosen to work within the design framework. Both masts are on tabernacles so that the rig can be easily lowered for canal passages. The aft pilot house design was selected allowing a large shaded (with boom canvas) outside deck area for carefree warm weather anchorages.

Oysta42RenderLooking at the accommodations, one can see a large, forward master cabin as a private refuge. The head is clear up in the bows of the boat with a separate shower and enough room to dress in leisurely comfort. There are bureaus and hanging lockers for clothing and stowage for a long cruise, and a reading seat to allow some private moments away from other crew members. Just aft of the master’s cabin is a separate cabin with its own access from a large 3 x 3′ deck hatch (which also functions as a mid-deck table). With port and starboard berths, this cabin functions as a crew’s quarters or the guest cabin for visiting family members or friends. Access to the large engine room is through the aft bulkhead of the guest cabin.

Power can be either twin small diesels of 50 hp each, or with one large single diesel of 100-120 hp. My own choice would be twin 4 cylinder 50 hp diesels as the maneuvering edge gained by twin engine installation more than justifies the small additional cost. And while motor-sailing, the lee sided engine can be left running which helps keep the shipboard electrics in shape.

In effect, the two diesels function like a built-in generator providing 12 volt and 110 AC power through high-output alternators and generous battery bank storage capabilities. Fuel tankage allows a range of 1,500 nautical miles under power alone.

Moving aft past the large mid cockpit, the pilot house is entered through port and starboard sliding doors, and features a centerline mounted helm with inside-or-outside steering, chart table to starboard, galley to port, and a real bridge to work the boat from. Stepping aft and down is a huge settee with a large table and enough room to accommodate 6 adults. A small head is off to port for quick access from the pilothouse and salon.

With tabernacle rigs, a displacement of 24,000 lbs., modest draft of 5’0″ and room enough for a long cruise, I can just imagine leaving the snow behind for warm Caribbean winds, with good ripe local fruit and pungent island rum – and best of all with my favorite mate to enthusiastically share my adventure. — Sam Devlin

The Oysta 42 is available in study plans and as a custom build from Sam Devlin and his crack crew.

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Oysta 42 Specifications

Length 42 ft. – 1 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 1 in.
Draft 60 in.
Power Inboard diesel, twin 50hp or single 100-150hp
Displacement 28000 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Sail Area 481 sq. ft.
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Camarone 34

Camarone34RenderSomewhere in 2005 I was contacted by a customer about the idea of designing a motorsailer suitable for some extended passagemaking. She had to be stable and a decent boat both under power and sail. Unfortunately, he was caught in Hurricane Katrina and his boating plans changed abruptly, but I thought you might like to take a look at what I came up with to address his needs.  I don’t need to remind anyone that most trips in a sailboat that are longer in duration than a brief afternoon wandering about on the water involve some sort of an engine, and that engine most likely spends more time in action than the sails on the boat.  Thus it has puzzled me for many years why don’t we see more boats on the water that resemble this Camarone 34 with her pilothouse, enclosed steering, decent and low center of effort sailplan appropriately split up into small enough panels to actually get used, not just sleep under sail covers. When using her for cruising, the inboard steering allows warm, quiet, and comfortable cruising under power and if you are so lucky to have favorable breezes in the afternoon, you can transition to the cockpit and run her very nicely either sailing or motorsailing.

Camarone34TopNotice the interior on her – a great arrangement if you ask me. Entering the pilothouse from the spacious cockpit, there is an ‘L’ shaped dinette area with helm forward, allowing the skipper to either stand at the helm for high-attention time or put her in autopilot and lounge back on the settee with legs out in front and reclining up against the rear bulkhead of the house. A nice counter height chart table is to starboard with lots of space for the charts and tide tables necessary for keeping a boat navigating safely. There is a wet gear locker at the aft end of the chart table so wet rain gear can be hung to dry, draining into the cockpit anything that wants to drip off them.Go down a few steps forward into the foc’sle of the boat and we find a nice and very spacious head compartment to starboard under that chart table. There is a nice standing headroom shower at the aft end which is a very nice feature in keeping the cruise comfortable.  The galley is to port from the centerline and has a deep sink, a nice below counter fridge, or dry stowage locker, and a full range.  Camarone34PlanFor our Northwest cruising with our capability of boating well into the Winter season, I would opt for a diesel range with oven built-in and a full hot burner top, allowing us to always keep a coffee or teapot ready to use.  Up forward in the bows of the boat is a very interesting arrangement with a port and starboard berth seating area and table in the middle.  With the table folded down, the area turns into a swell full double berth with enough swinging room to keep any cruising couple in good shape.  When in passage, you could leave the table in the up position and have a nice separate port and starboard berth.  One really cool idea with this design is that once you are down below, you are looking clear up into the bows of the boat. When so many other boats keep the main cabin cut up with separate cabins, this one feels bright, airy, and large.  The flush deck also adds to the look and feel of this forward cabin with 4” x 4” beams being the only thing breaking up a tongue and groove, yellow cedar fore and aft planking. This gives a warm and textured feeling to the spacious cabin.  We put plenty of draft and plenty of keel under her to allow good sailing and a very balanced helm with any of the sail/power combinations that might be possible with her.

This Camarone (Spanish for Shrimp) design follows close to my heart as the most perfect boat I can imagine. Suitable for cruising either north to Alaska or south to Mexico, she is a boat that has spent many fine hours in my dreams. – Sam Devlin

The Camerone 34 is available as study plans.

 

Camerone 34 Specifications

Length on Deck 33 ft. – 5 in.
Beam 11 ft. – 4 in.
Draft 5 ft. – 3 in.
Power Inboard diesel 30-50hp/sail
Displacement 17000 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Sail Area Total 839 sq.ft.
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Auk

A customer occasionally graces me with his conceptual drawings for a new vessel. A while ago he brought in a drawing for a motorsailor. She had a cat/yawl rig with the masts folding down in a tabernacle for low bridge clearance and to allow storage in a boat house. After a little editing, the Auk is the result.

She is a perky vessel in most eyes. The flush deck yields lots of interior space. The pilothouse adds light to help relieve the claustrophobia of rainy coast life. A simple, yet functional, interior design affords more lounging comfort for two than most boats in her size range.

The power is a small lightweight diesel running through a saildrive in the stern. She uses an outboard rudder for steering with a small mizzen to help balance the helm in a breeze. The mizzen can be unstepped and used as a sailrig on a dinghy, perhaps a Polliwog.

I have noticed a lot of people deciding to forgo cruising with two or three couples in exchange for a sane afternoon of gunkholing in some out-of-the-way place in a small but very able vessel such as this. — Sam Devlin

The Auk is a concept drawing at this point. Contact Sam if you would like to see the design developed.

Auk Specifications

Length 22 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 2 in.
Draft 3 ft.
Power Diesel Sail Drive
Displacement  
Hull Type Displacement
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