Kingfisher 33

The Kingfisher 33 design became a reality with its launch recently in Olympia.  It’s featured on the cover of the November 2017 issue of Passagemaker Magazine and as part of an in depth article on the history of Devlin Boat in the same issue.  This is a diesel powered inboard cruising boat with a large cockpit for fishing or hobnobbing with fellow boaters when you’re out and about in the Pacific Northwest waters.  We have study plans available.

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Blue Fin 54

Sam designs in groups in his ongoing quest for unbelievable flexibility in boat design. The Blue Fin 54 is an adaption of the Blue Fin 48, which you should check out for the thought process behind her design. In the 54 variant, you keep the stunning efficiency and add more space and comfort, while keeping the fuel economy and designed-in ability to smooth out choppy waters. Sam has designed a single and twin screw version. The twin screw version offers a bit more performance and the ability to use the twin configuration for maneuverability in tight situations. The single screw version offers amazing efficiency for going the distance with minimal fuel burn. Our friend Temur Rukhaya has not only completed a sterling build of this design, he has given us real world data on the outcome of fuel efficiency. Read about Temur’s build here. Get the study plans here. Get the free poster here.

 

RPM Speed (knots) Fuel Consumption (l/h) Fuel Consumption (g/h)
750 5.1 5 1.32
1000 6.5 5.5 1.45
1100 7.0 7.2 1.90
1200 7.8 7.4 1.95
1300 8.4 7.4 1.95
1400 9.2 8.4 2.22
1500 9.7 9.5 2.51
1600 10.4 11.6 3.06
1700 10.8 14.6 3.86
1800 11.4 15.8 4.17
1900 12.0 17.4 4.60
2000 12.8 26 6.87
2300 15.3
2400 16.1
2500 16.8


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Blue Peter 30

A glimpse into a boat capable of true off-shore cruising, Blue Peter is offered in two versions that illustrate just how much variation can happen on the same footprint.

The rig change is most dramatic. From a profile sail plan view with one version showing bowsprit and a more open slot between staysail and jib to the other showing a stem headed sail plan. Moving inside, the stem-headed version shows the interior that is my personal favorite. Stepping into the companionway, one can see clearly to the bow of the boat. By keeping the head aft and to starboard, it doesn’t cut up the interior into two separate cabins. The galley is to port with enough space to get the job done and with close proximity to the cockpit, a quick duck below for a cup of tea during a long night watch is possible.

Large port and starboard settees with a dinette table amidships allows comfortable seating and the chance to sit and tell stories with friends. Relaxing after a long day’s sail seems more important with the older I get. The port and starboard settees and double berth forward accommodate a crew of four.

The bowsprit version shows a much different interior with port and starboard quarter berths and a fixed chart table to starboard used by sitting on the end of the starboard berth. The galley is to port with a peninsula into the cabin to allow a close-to-centerline sink location, good for draining on either tack. The port and starboard settees, somewhat offset, don’t allow for as easy a conversation area as the other interior but should work well at sea with berths on either tack.

The head with shower is on the starboard side and a single forward berth is to the opposite. This interior would probably cruise off-shore more efficiently than the other with more possible sea berths but in my view, it isn’t quite as comfortable for on shore cruising where most evenings, the Blue Peter would be anchored in a quiet cove.

Inboard diesel power of up to 18 hp is a must on a boat like Blue Peter. Being as fine a mate as most, she’s a good looking boat with an agreeable profile. — Sam Devlin

The Blue Peter is available as a custom build from Sam and his team.

Blue Peter 30 Specifications

Length (LOD) 30 ft. – 2 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 55 in.
Power Inboard diesel 18hp
Hull Type Displacement

 

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Moss Rock

Moss Rock began life as the solution to the living requirements of a client. He wanted to live on the water in a simple, roomy comfortable boat that was easy to maintain. He also wanted a stable platform in which to cruise Puget Sound with his aging parents.

The result is a rig that is simple and inexpensive, a gaff sloop with galvanized rigging. The volume needed for a live-aboard also suggested the scow-type hull. That shape also yields an interior that is roomy and comfortable which, with the right touch, has a cottage coziness. The port aft section easily accommodates a standard double mattress with the settee and chart table completing the port mid-section. The head has a water closet and a self-contained shower unit located in the starboard mid-section next to the galley and the wood or diesel heating stove. The center board trunk divides the cabin providing pantry shelves on the galley side and book shelves on the port side. The cabin has full standing headroom with the large port lights keeping the interior well-lit and homey.

The deck plan shows no footwell aft; a helm seat accompanies the large wheel. Auxiliary power can be in the form of an inboard diesel with the shaft set off-center or a 35 HP outboard in a well.

The foredeck has a large 36 in x 36 in hatch giving access to organized stowage below. There are 10 inch bulwarks fore and aft and a raised deck in the way of a deck house. Moss Rock exudes a charm of her own and would not look out of place in a wooded cove with sails furled and potted plants on the decks. — Sam Devlin

The Moss Rock is available as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

MossRockPlanRoughMossRockProfileRough

Moss Rock Specifications

Length on Deck 30 ft. – 0 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 24 in.
Power Inboard diesel or outboard 35hp
Hull Type Displacement
Sail area 527 sq. ft.
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Czarinna 30

Czarinna30ErieCanalShe is a very traditional looking yacht with a plumb bow and a fantail stern forming the ends of an easily driven hull. Her forward pilothouse meshes nicely with a large beamy main salon aft of the helm/galley area. Comfort underway is of main importance here with 6’4″ head room in the main salon. Four large opening windows in the salon area are set to perfect viewing height while seated in the salon. There is also a large 24″ x 36″ hatch/skylight on the salon cabin top which hinges upward for ventilation.

The head is on the starboard side, at the aft end of the main salon. With the water closet and a remarkable Pullman-style sink/wash basin that folds onto the bulkhead, this head compartment can convert into a shower stall for longer cruises.

A solid-fuel heater is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the head. In winter, the boat is warm and dry without the sweating and mildew problems normally associated with most boats in today’s market. In the summer, the feeling in the main salon is like sitting in a large screened porch. Both settees are 68″ long and double as berths. There is a folding leaf table which can accommodate anything from casual drinks to formal dining for four.

Forward of the main salon is the raised pilothouse with port and starboard helm seats and galley space aft on both sides. Refrigeration tucks neatly below the companion helm seat and there is stowage on both sides under the counters. A propane stove allows the cook to enjoy the ride in the pilothouse with excellent visibility and full 72″ headroom. Forward in the fo’c’sle, accessible through a hinged hatch, is a large berth and storage area. This can be a private suite or out-of-the-way storage.

The twin 18 hp YANMAR diesels will cruise Czarinna at 7 knots at 1900 RPM. Czarinna30LateThe noise, vibration and smell normally associated with high speed boats just doesn’t develop on Czarinna. Each engine is tucked out of the way, under the settees, port and starboard, in a sound insulated seat compartment. Fuel consumption is very economical, two-thirds of a gallon of diesel per hour, at her cruising speed of 7 knots. It’s hard to imagine cruising more economically than this these days.

— Sam Devlin

The Czarinna 30 is available in study and full construction plans, and as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

Czarinna30PlanCzarinna30Profile

Czarinna 30 Specifications

Length 29 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 30 in.
Power Inboard diesel twin 18hp
Displacement 8900 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Speed 7 knot cruise
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Amak Tugboats

Amak 44 Cabin
Amak 44 Cabin

Tugboats have been a long standing theme in my life and I started my tug-affliction at an early age.  When I was in kindergarten at the age of 5, I won an art competition with a tugboat composition and even though the medium was smeary crayon, it showed some promise of tug-work in my design quiver even at that young phase of my life.  During my college years, I worked on several different tugs in Alaska, saving my money and helping to grubstake me thru school at the University of Oregon.  The very first tug that I worked on was named the ‘Amak’ and a fine example of the type she was, home ported in Ketchikan, Alaska and as I recall, built in the late 1890s. She was wood, of course, nicely detailed (though she was a working tug), had a Cat diesel engine and after just a few days on board, I was hooked.  The ‘Amak’ was to change my life. I read issue #1 of WoodenBoat magazine onboard her and made up my mind that boats, indeed wooden boats, were to be my life choice of hobby, avocation, passion, and career.

To celebrate the spirit of that first tug, I have named these models, in all their sizes, the ‘Amak’ series and I tell you this, in all confidence, that if my ship ever comes in and I reach a time in my life when I want to slow down just a bit, I would like to build one of these boats and do a bit more tugging myself.  You can look at the designs and dream all the modifications you might want but always keep in mind that a tug needs quite a bit of weight, a big screw (propeller), and some old style horsepower to keep her happy. Enjoy!  — Sam Devlin

The entire series is available in study plans. Contact Sam to develop your custom dream tugboat.

Amak 26
Amak 26

Amak 26 Specifications

Length on Deck 26 ft. – 3 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 39 in.
Power Inboard diesel 30-100hp
Displacement 9000 lbs.
Amak 32
Amak 32

Amak 32 Specifications

Length on Deck 32 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 10 in.
Draft 44 in.
Power Inboard diesel 50-100hp
Displacement 18000 lbs.
Amak 38
Amak 38

Amak 38 Specifications

Length on Deck 37 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 4 in.
Draft 50 in.
Power Inboard diesel 120-250hp
Displacement 33000 lbs.
Amak 44
Amak 44
Amak 44 Deck Plan
Amak 44 Deck Plan

Amak 44 Specifications

Length on Deck 43 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 14 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 69 in.
Power Inboard diesel 200-350hp
Displacement 45000 lbs.
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Kingfisher 30

Kingfisher30FAcropA fellow dropped into my office a couple of months ago with a novel idea. He is the owner of a Power Scow which is a type of boat I would expect only a few readers of my design write-ups to be familiar with. A power scow is pretty much what the name says; it is a powered barge on the water long used in the Southeast Alaska fisheries as buy boats which are boats that goes out to the fishing grounds, buys fish from the fishing boats and sells ice and other limited supplies to the fishermen. After filling their own holds with fresh caught fish, the buy boat heads off to the nearest town or cannery to offload. This chap has a particularly nice power scow built in the 1940s and he has done a yeoman’s job of keeping her in good shape and running condition. She has the latest fillet machines, flash freezing capabilities and vacuum packing on board and for these premium line caught salmon and halibut, she does an extraordinary job of keeping the fish fresh, clean, and ready for the freezer or the skillet.

But back to our visit — you see he is a visionary type of guy always thinking out into the future with a keen eye on the prize of keeping his power scow working hard and efficiently and also keeping several fish markets and a growing internet market supplied with his amazing product. These Alaskan fish are of such quality that anyone could provide them a place in their diet without fear or regret. But he had a new vision one that was just at the wee starting place of forming shape and that is where his visit with me came into the picture. He was thinking that there might be a small number of individuals who are in their late middle years, perhaps even retired from their first careers, but not yet ready to hang it all up. These individuals might also want a bit of adventure in their lives, ready to see waters and areas that they hadn’t the time to do earlier in their lives and careers. And so he was thinking that these hardy souls might be interested in setting up small fishing businesses built around the design that I am outlining here and built around his power scow.

With the power scow, he would have the facilities for the fishermen to drop off their catch on a daily basis, take a shower and have a hot meal each day, and maybe even a hand or two of cards before crawling into the sack. Up at dawn, or just a bit before dawn, to drop in on the morning bite and they are back to work. If a longer trip is desired to explore a little, the accommodations on the Kingfisher are compatible to the skipper and crew and anything from a couple of days to a longer trip might be possible, springing them only slightly loose from the friends and convenience of the power scow each night.

So let’s take a closer look at the Kingfisher design that I came up with. She is not a huge boat at just over 30 feet in length but with that utility of staying close to the mothership, she really doesn’t need to be much longer and therefore have good fuel economy and seaworthy comfort for the crew. She can be rigged for either hand trolling (non-powered gurdies which control the lines for bringing the fish into the boat) or she can be powered with a small hydraulic pump that would run off the engine and can be rigged as a power troller. There are twin 18 foot long trolling poles on either side of the single mast and these are lowered to about a 45 degree angle off the port and starboard sides of the boats helping to keep the fishing lines out of each other’s way. They can also be used to set small paravanes for running when the weather is really snotty and these simple gear additions can really make the difference between just a crappy day and one that could provide you with real story fodder. If you are anything like me, even though I like a good story, the older I get, the less I desire to experience those “really good” story days if you follow my drift. Anyway, the paravanes work very well at allowing the boat to continue into waters that might really blunt the progress of an unstabilized hull.

There is good deck space and instead of a fixed cargo hold (which could be done but a simpler solution is available), we are using large poly plastic totes that are chucked on the deck and when offloading fish, a bag that is held in the tub can be hoisted to the buy boat and a simple cleaning of the deck and totes is all that is necessary to keep the boat clean and organized. Moving forward into the pilothouse, the cabin follows a couple of ideas that I might have tried to hit you over the head with in the past but without hearing much of a thud, I want to try them again and they involve two subjects that need addressing. The first is the head and how to keep the crew and the skipper happy and comfortable. While the Kingfisher concept is one that might involve a single fisherman on board, (and my first inclination was to reduce the need or desire to have anything like a private head compartment on board), upon presenting the preliminary sketches to my co-workers, I was told rather bluntly that the boat would need a head to have any chance at seeing the light of day as a concept. So let’s address the idea of how to deal with a head in a boat and have it be really be functional enough to allow some privacy when being used. One of the features I noticed on lots of working boats, fishing and tug, is that the head compartment is very often not common or connected to the interior of the boat. That is to say they are accessed from the stern or side decks of the boat with an entirely separate door to the deck. And with no common door to the interior of the boat, you have a chance to actually use the head with some semblance of privacy. Once a common door to the inside of the boat gets put in the design, those privacy features go literally out the door. If you use the head for a shower, then you have the additional problem of what to do after adding considerable moisture into the interior of a boat that might be operating in a high humidity environment and the problem of how to truly and easily dry out the boat, which leads nicely into the second thought of mine.

Kingfisher30FAHeat is a problem in most boats that run in the Northwest coastal waters of North America (my favorite and most often frequented waters), and it’s not called the rainy northwest for nothing! It’s not unusual for a typical cruiser or boater to do a long trip up to Alaska and back and never once put on a short sleeved shirt in the whole summer. In fact, we occasionally have summers where wool shirts and jackets are worn every day as a hedge against the cool and moist climate. On virtually all Northwest Coast working boats they fix this problem with a simple and ingenious solution, one that anything from a 20 feet cruiser up to a boat well over a hundred feet in length can use. The solution is an oil cooking range. Some of the best of these and the ones most common in the Northwest are made by the Dickinson company of British Columbia just to the north of my own Washington State. They come in a variety of sizes and configurations and the idea is that they are lit early in the trip, even sometimes before the engine is started, the thermostat and heat control has simple settings and burning diesel or even a cleaner burn with kerosene fuel, they just sit there and heat away, letting the whole interior of the boat stay warm and dry. The cast iron top of the stove radiates the heat very well and a pot can be kept on one of the corners instantly providing you with warm beverage capability whenever desired. If you come into the interior of the boat with wet rain gear, the boat doesn’t instantly fog up with the added moisture and you keep your windows clear and warm your bones up very quickly. I call this the ‘haven of warmth’ theory, and if you ever try it, you too will realize that when you wrap your head around the idea that the boat is always warm and dry no matter what the conditions are outside, you will quickly think of your boat as being protective and a haven of warmth and comfort. So even if we are foolish enough to have the door to the head opening into the interior of the boat, we can still dry her out quickly after taking a hot shower and everything will stay smelling nice and sweet.

I say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and to my eye, this design looks just about right with good utility and function and she is trailerable to boot. With her inboard diesel engine, the fuel economy is good and depending on how much horsepower you give her, the speed can be adjusted from anything in the full displacement range up to semi-displacements speeds. – Sam Devlin

The Kingfisher 30 is available as study plans and as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

Kingfisher30PlanKingfisher30Side

Kingfisher 30 Specifications

Length on Deck 30 ft. – 2 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 1 in.
Draft 38 in.
Power Inboard diesel 110-160hp
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Displacement 10700 lbs.

 

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Means of Grace

MeansOfGraceSideMeans of Grace was designed for a friend that has owned one of our Surf Scoters for the last 5 years. He has found himself at a career crossroad that allows him to contemplate extensive cruising. Originally I thought that a 38′ ketch would handle his needs most efficiently. After months of sketches and discussions, he became concerned that 38′ would be too large for him to handle alone and that an interim design would be appropriate. The smaller boat, Means of Grace, would be more manageable short-handed which reminds me that the most important function of a boat is its usability. If a boat is not usable from both a physical and mental point of view, then it is not successful.

“Cush” was quite taken with the Lyle Hess-designed, Bristol Channel Cutter, and so Means of Grace shares several similar concepts. The footprint is that of a small, heavy displacement boat with a true cutter rig. The interior is similar, and from an inspirational point of view, the Bristol Channel Cutter served as a nice starting place for the design.

MeansofGraceMagI consulted in depth with Carol Hasse of Port Townsend Sails on the sail plan. Carol has extensive off-shore sailing experience and she and her partner manufacture a most lovely sail.

As a result of Carol’s suggestions, we have an inventory of 7 sails. This covers every wind speed in approximately 10 knot increments from 0 to 80 knots. The final sail plan is a main tri-sail, either alone, or with a heavy storm stay’-sail. With this much possibility in sail combination, Cush can sail on his own beloved Maine coast, or off-shore on long ocean passages. — Sam Devlin

The Means of grace is available as study and full construction plans.

MeansOfGracePlan

Means of Grace Specifications

Length on Deck 28 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 60 in.
Power Inboard diesel
Sail Area 537 sq. ft.
Hull Type Displacement
Displacement 12900 lbs.
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Onyx

OnyxHullMost of our work with stitch-and-glue composite construction has been with single-chine, vee-bottom vessels. As inevitably happens, either a customer comes along in need of a little more shape in the hull or because of our own growth process, we decide it’s time to test our wings a bit and try some new ground. The Onyx is a true multi-chine design.

As you look at the sections, it’s not hard to imagine her as a round bottomed hull with some defining laps. The laps are, of course, plywood panels, and she is indeed a stitch-and-glue composite construction boat. We have taken theOnyxSideFull dimensions of a small but capable off-shore vessel, with an outboard rudder and inboard rig contributing to her simplicity and seaworthiness. She has what I consider to be my favorite type of interior, with the galley to port, head to starboard and a graceful trunk cabin providing 6’3″ headroom. Forward are the port and starboard settees with comfortable seating for all my guests. A cabin table can be fitted that’s attached to the mast, an option available to the user. Forward is a large double berth and a chain locker in the bow. A foredeck hatch can provide ventilation and some handy sail-handling access.

All in all, she is simple, looks efficient and I believe would be a capable vessel compared to most available. — Sam Devlin

 

The Onyx is available in study and construction plans, and as a custom build from Devlin boats.

OnyxPlan

Onyx Specifications

Length on Deck 27 ft. – 7 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 54 in.
Power Inboard diesel
Sail Area 401 sq. ft.
Hull Type Displacement
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