Blue Fin 54 ‘Lucky Star’ – Built in Russia

It would be hard to find a more sterling example of a customer built Devlin boat. This Blue Fin 54 was built by Temur Rukhaya and his crew in Russia. Temur named her the ‘Lucky Star’. He not only builds a beautiful boat, but he makes great videos as well.

Here is his showcase video for the ‘Lucky Star’.

In Temur’s own words…

About four years ago (or more) I ordered the Blue Fin 54 boat project.
In the spring of 2014 the boat was launched.
I called the boat “Lucky Star”

Today  the boat ran over 8,000 nautical miles.
This year, I came to the White Sea and was in Sankt- Petersburg.
During this pass, I crossed about 100 locks. On Ladoga Lake was a heavy storm.
Technology “stitch and glue” deserves the best endorsement.
The boat is very comfortable, quiet, easy to use and on the go.

Temur was kind enough to make a build video.

Being a boat building company, we always want to know the details. Once again, Temur delivers in fine fashion.

Installed engine Vetus 231 hp / 2500 rev / min
Transmission 1: 2.78
Propeller 4 x 28 “x 27”
Displacement about 8500 kg
Fuel consumption: 14 knt – 0.75 l / km
9 knt – 0.5 l / km
Max. speed (unloaded boats) 16-17 knt
Two fuel tanks 1,100 liters each.
Diesel generator Vetus 4kW
Solar cells 6 x 140 watt
Water tank  2×230 liters
Black water tank 230 liters
Air Conditioning 9000 BT
Heating – diesel boiler combined with the engine cooling system.
When sailing – the boat is heated by the engine. On mooring – from the boiler(diesel heater).

 

Although Temur has noted the comfort, quiet operation, and ease of use of the “Lucky Star’, the hallmark of the Blue Fin 54 is her easy running efficiency. Here are his calculations for fuel economy.

 

RPM Speed (knots) Fuel Consumption (l/h) Fuel Consumption (g/h)
750 5.1 5 1.32
1000 6.5 5.5 1.45
1100 7.0 7.2 1.90
1200 7.8 7.4 1.95
1300 8.4 7.4 1.95
1400 9.2 8.4 2.22
1500 9.7 9.5 2.51
1600 10.4 11.6 3.06
1700 10.8 14.6 3.86
1800 11.4 15.8 4.17
1900 12.0 17.4 4.60
2000 12.8 26 6.87
2300 15.3
2400 16.1
2500 16.8

As an example of what this kind of efficiency means in practice, look at this video of the acceleration of a 54 foot boat.

Our congratulations to Temur for a spectacular build, and our thanks for all data to go with it! All that information folds back into Sam’s ongoing understanding of how to design great boats across the spectrum of nautical goals and dreams. The ‘Lucky Star’ is more than a boat. It’s a builder’s example of what can be done with a dream, a design, and dedication.

Now, finally, some interior shots of the build, including the ever popular “Dog is my Co-pilot” shot. Lucky dog!

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Millie Hill 28

MillieHill28RenderHelmA good friend and boatbuilder in Korea commissioned this design. It followed some correspondence that we had about a preliminary design on the same concept done originally in 25ft. of length with a 10ft. beam but we quickly realized that if we really intended this to be a potential live aboard “Shanty Boat”, that some extra length and beam would pay dividends and give us much more room to work and live with and we quickly landed on this 28 ft x 12 ft version.

This idea of a “Shanty Boat’ is a beguiling one that holds many hours of musings and dreams in its web;  the concept of doing a vessel that is commodious enough to really be comfortable as a live-aboard and one that could be moved from place to place either by water or by land as she is still of a size that a good flatbed trailer could move her about with ease.  Imagine all the different adventures that we might have with her, perhaps starting down the Mississippi River, stopping for any length of time in all the interesting spots you discover, anchoring when privacy is desired and stopping MillieHill28RenderGalleyperiodically at marinas to pick up enough supplies to keep us in food and drinks.  With the proper sized outboard, she could actually move-about under her own power enough to justify the expense and mess of rigging a control station. But a real salt would match her with a small tug (something like one of our Godzilla 22 or 25ft. models) and tow her about, using the tug like the car/pickup that all conventional landlocked campers have.  Anchor in some secluded little bight in the waterway and use the tug to go to town re-stocking the larder or perhaps just for a break and a meal.  Return to the mother ship and you’ve got your home intact and waiting patiently for you.

She has a good amount of space on her covered rear deck. This deck is at a lower level closer to the waterline which helps make boarding and exiting the boat easier and also allows us to sit in the shade on a warm day.  If you fancy doing a bit of sunning, you’ve got a couple of options — either the fore-deck or it wouldn’t be all that difficult to climb up onto the foreward cabin top for a view of the world that would be unmatched.

MillieHill28RenderRoof

MillieHill28RenderSalonBut it is the cabin with its volume and spaces that really is the attraction of this boat with all the functions of a normal home — kitchen, bath, lounging, sleeping, stowage, bookshelves and entertainment center.  If you really fancy living off the grid, a simple little gas or diesel generator could be fitted that would allow her to be fully functional and self-contained, but she also would be fitted with shore power connections that allows you to hook up to electrical at the marina.  It is also simple to hook up to marina pressure water making her a completely functional floating home.  The Millie Hill 28 has a full sized queen bed that can be arranged in a couple of ways and with both sides of the bed accessible, it’s ready to crawl into easily and comfortably.  There is a full dinette that can seat 4 adults for a meal and with the opposing seat/couch, you can find yourself with a couple of possibilities for settling in for the evening. Stowage is built into the bases of these seating areas, always with the thought in mind that there seems to never be enough space for MillieHill28RenderPlanstowage on a boat.  There are little bonus areas also — a computer desk on the starboard side that allows a space for this very vital function of modern life and a hanging locker on the port side.  There is a shower in the head compartment and if desired, there’s even room for an all-in-one washer/dryer to be fitted into the underside of the linen stowage area in the head.  Virtually every function of the normal home can be accommodated but most importantly, you can move the Millie Hill to wherever you desire which is really the key to this platform.  There might be many hundreds of options of how you configure your own interior or set her up but the footprint of a bi-level cabin, with boarding area in the stern and the possibility of moving her about either under her own power or with a tug tow, is not to be understated.

Plans are available for $225 dollars and we have both Metric or Imperial measurement versions. — Sam Devlin

The Millie Hill 28 is available in study and construction plans, and as a custom build from Sam and his team.

MillieHill28RenderProfileMillieHill28PlanMillieHill28Profile

Millie Hill 28 Specifications

Length 38 ft. – 5 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 13 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 14000 lbs.
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Blue Peter 30

A glimpse into a boat capable of true off-shore cruising, Blue Peter is offered in two versions that illustrate just how much variation can happen on the same footprint.

The rig change is most dramatic. From a profile sail plan view with one version showing bowsprit and a more open slot between staysail and jib to the other showing a stem headed sail plan. Moving inside, the stem-headed version shows the interior that is my personal favorite. Stepping into the companionway, one can see clearly to the bow of the boat. By keeping the head aft and to starboard, it doesn’t cut up the interior into two separate cabins. The galley is to port with enough space to get the job done and with close proximity to the cockpit, a quick duck below for a cup of tea during a long night watch is possible.

Large port and starboard settees with a dinette table amidships allows comfortable seating and the chance to sit and tell stories with friends. Relaxing after a long day’s sail seems more important with the older I get. The port and starboard settees and double berth forward accommodate a crew of four.

The bowsprit version shows a much different interior with port and starboard quarter berths and a fixed chart table to starboard used by sitting on the end of the starboard berth. The galley is to port with a peninsula into the cabin to allow a close-to-centerline sink location, good for draining on either tack. The port and starboard settees, somewhat offset, don’t allow for as easy a conversation area as the other interior but should work well at sea with berths on either tack.

The head with shower is on the starboard side and a single forward berth is to the opposite. This interior would probably cruise off-shore more efficiently than the other with more possible sea berths but in my view, it isn’t quite as comfortable for on shore cruising where most evenings, the Blue Peter would be anchored in a quiet cove.

Inboard diesel power of up to 18 hp is a must on a boat like Blue Peter. Being as fine a mate as most, she’s a good looking boat with an agreeable profile. — Sam Devlin

The Blue Peter is available as a custom build from Sam and his team.

Blue Peter 30 Specifications

Length (LOD) 30 ft. – 2 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 55 in.
Power Inboard diesel 18hp
Hull Type Displacement

 

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Moss Rock

Moss Rock began life as the solution to the living requirements of a client. He wanted to live on the water in a simple, roomy comfortable boat that was easy to maintain. He also wanted a stable platform in which to cruise Puget Sound with his aging parents.

The result is a rig that is simple and inexpensive, a gaff sloop with galvanized rigging. The volume needed for a live-aboard also suggested the scow-type hull. That shape also yields an interior that is roomy and comfortable which, with the right touch, has a cottage coziness. The port aft section easily accommodates a standard double mattress with the settee and chart table completing the port mid-section. The head has a water closet and a self-contained shower unit located in the starboard mid-section next to the galley and the wood or diesel heating stove. The center board trunk divides the cabin providing pantry shelves on the galley side and book shelves on the port side. The cabin has full standing headroom with the large port lights keeping the interior well-lit and homey.

The deck plan shows no footwell aft; a helm seat accompanies the large wheel. Auxiliary power can be in the form of an inboard diesel with the shaft set off-center or a 35 HP outboard in a well.

The foredeck has a large 36 in x 36 in hatch giving access to organized stowage below. There are 10 inch bulwarks fore and aft and a raised deck in the way of a deck house. Moss Rock exudes a charm of her own and would not look out of place in a wooded cove with sails furled and potted plants on the decks. — Sam Devlin

The Moss Rock is available as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

MossRockPlanRoughMossRockProfileRough

Moss Rock Specifications

Length on Deck 30 ft. – 0 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 24 in.
Power Inboard diesel or outboard 35hp
Hull Type Displacement
Sail area 527 sq. ft.
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Czarinna 30

Czarinna30ErieCanalShe is a very traditional looking yacht with a plumb bow and a fantail stern forming the ends of an easily driven hull. Her forward pilothouse meshes nicely with a large beamy main salon aft of the helm/galley area. Comfort underway is of main importance here with 6’4″ head room in the main salon. Four large opening windows in the salon area are set to perfect viewing height while seated in the salon. There is also a large 24″ x 36″ hatch/skylight on the salon cabin top which hinges upward for ventilation.

The head is on the starboard side, at the aft end of the main salon. With the water closet and a remarkable Pullman-style sink/wash basin that folds onto the bulkhead, this head compartment can convert into a shower stall for longer cruises.

A solid-fuel heater is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the head. In winter, the boat is warm and dry without the sweating and mildew problems normally associated with most boats in today’s market. In the summer, the feeling in the main salon is like sitting in a large screened porch. Both settees are 68″ long and double as berths. There is a folding leaf table which can accommodate anything from casual drinks to formal dining for four.

Forward of the main salon is the raised pilothouse with port and starboard helm seats and galley space aft on both sides. Refrigeration tucks neatly below the companion helm seat and there is stowage on both sides under the counters. A propane stove allows the cook to enjoy the ride in the pilothouse with excellent visibility and full 72″ headroom. Forward in the fo’c’sle, accessible through a hinged hatch, is a large berth and storage area. This can be a private suite or out-of-the-way storage.

The twin 18 hp YANMAR diesels will cruise Czarinna at 7 knots at 1900 RPM. Czarinna30LateThe noise, vibration and smell normally associated with high speed boats just doesn’t develop on Czarinna. Each engine is tucked out of the way, under the settees, port and starboard, in a sound insulated seat compartment. Fuel consumption is very economical, two-thirds of a gallon of diesel per hour, at her cruising speed of 7 knots. It’s hard to imagine cruising more economically than this these days.

— Sam Devlin

The Czarinna 30 is available in study and full construction plans, and as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

Czarinna30PlanCzarinna30Profile

Czarinna 30 Specifications

Length 29 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 30 in.
Power Inboard diesel twin 18hp
Displacement 8900 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Speed 7 knot cruise
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Black Crown 30

BlackCrownBigWaterWe have over the past 20 years built our Black Crown design in many, many flavors, from 25ft. to 32ft in lengths and now offer the full building plans for home construction the distillation of all our experience with the design and what she has to offer.

This new 30ft. version offers a commodious and comfortable cockpit with space for the engine box (we recommend a diesel Sterndrive in 160-250hp range) and seating for crew when the hook is down and you just want to enjoy the evening breeze. Going into the cabin there is a full enclosed and private head to starboard and a full headroom shower just opposite on the port side. Forward of the shower is a fore and aft facing dinette with room to seat 4 for cocktails or an intimate dinner. Galley is to starboard and forward of the head and aft of the helm seat. Space for a below counter refrigerator/freezer unit, sink, and range oven cook top. Helm seat is to starboard and forward of the galley as mentioned above and has excellent visibility and comfortable seating, room for electronics instruments etc.

BlackCrownHelm

On the port side of the boat and opposite the helm is a side facing co-helm seat that works well for keeping an extra pair of eyes scanning forward while the boat is running but also allowing good conversation with the skipper. Forward of the main salon area is a large double berth that can be built with either a queen sized double slightly to starboard side or a port and starboard single berth that with a filler can be converted to a huge double berth running the full length of the bow and full width of the forward cabin (this is my own personal favorite arrangement). There is 6-5 headroom in the main salon cabin and good seating and sleeping headroom forward in the bow area.

BlackCrownDriftwoodQPerformance is good with a 200hp. Diesel Sterndrive giving her top speed of 25knots and a cruise speed of 18knots with a fuel burn of just under 5 gallons of fuel per hour. That gives you a fuel burn of 4.17 miles for each gallon of fuel used and that my friends is just about a good mileage as can be managed with a boat!

She can be loaded to a trailer for winter storage and these hulls are more than capable of traveling some very long cruises whether you are on the East Coast or the West Coast the Black Crown 30 can handle the seas and the waters that you will encounter and handle them with aplomb!

Our friends, Randy and Becky, along with their dog, Kahlua, have now trailered their Black Crown from Lake Powell up to the Puget Sound and back again with fine adventures and nothing more than a good 3/4 ton pickup with a diesel engine to tow it with fine living for those of us that keep perspective on the play vs. work balancing game. — Sam Devlin

The Black Crown is available in study and construction plans, as a custom build from Devlin Boats, and currently as a pre-loved Devlin Boat.

BlackCrown30PlanBlackCrown30Side

 

Black Crown 30 Specifications

Length 30 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 8.58 in.
Draft 26 in.
Power Inboard diesel stern drive
Displacement 10500 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Speed 18 knot cruise/29 knot max
Range 450 miles @ 18 knots

 

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Pyladian 31

Many of you faithful readers might remember the “Storm Petrel”, a 33ft. Lobster-type boat that we built several years ago, and the “Pyladian” is an evolution and direct sister to that design. With the perspective of about 5 years between the two building projects and with a chance to spend many happy hours bugging about in the Salish Sea in the Storm Petrel, I found her to be, in my opinion, one of the best performing sea-boats that I have ever had the pleasure of running. I remember heading north with my good friend George Gray (currently living with his wife on their sailboat and cruising the lovely waters of Mexico) to the Anacortes Trawler Fest show several years ago. It was a boisterous day with brisk winds of 25-30 knots coming out of the Southwest. With the fetch of Puget Sound and the short steep chop that can develop in those waters, it was a good test of what the Storm Petrel could do. With the following seas and our trying to maintain a pace of 16 plus knots of speed, the Storm Petrel would bound over the top of the crest of one wave and then pitch downward into the trough between the seas burying her bow into the wave just ahead of us till we could see water squirting up thru the anchor roller forward. Without slowing or slewing around in any way, she would then climb at the same speed up the face of the next wave reaching the top before pitching down again into the trough of the next. After about 30 minutes of this exhilarating ride, I remarked to George something about my amazement of such a remarkable ride to which he replied that he was impressed also. We chatted for a few more minutes about her amazing performance and no sooner had the words come out of my mouth, “we should turn around and try her head into the wind”, when I started turning the wheel. We did a good 15 minutes in reverse direction straight into the eye of the wind and those cresting waves with essentially the same results. The boat didn’t slow down and certainly didn’t broach or slew at the bottom of the troughs even when burying her nose deeply into the waves. Really, all in all, she showed remarkable capability for those seas, an incredibly pleasant boat to run on a day when I would normally wish I was home reading a good book by a warm fire. This combination of fine bow lines and entry with her broad and flat exit of run of the hull was literally the perfect example of what one would wish for in this type of boat.

So after some years, along came a new candidate for a boat, this time a couple that was looking for a commuter boat to run from Vancouver Island, specifically Sydney, British Columbia, to their island home located about 34 miles north in the Canadian Gulf Islands. They needed her to be able to make good and economical speed so that they could spend their time on the island not just going back and forth to it. The boat needed to be able to handle anything from a few groceries to large units of wood, fuel, and all the myriad of items necessary for comfortable island life. The weather would not always be compatible to this lifestyle and so the vessel would need to be able to handle the weather in whatever form that would be presented to it.

With those requirements set down, I had no hesitation in recommending the Storm Petrel type hull as a good model to choose from. But the customers wanted a single diesel (not the twin diesels that the Storm Petrel had) and needed the potential for more speed than the Storm Petrel boat had so the Yanmar 6LPA was chosen. With 300 horses under her engine box, the hull should top speed out at about 26-28 knots and cruise at 20 knots without difficulty. With the single diesel layout, the cabin changes considerably in its layout and in the potential layout options for the customers. De-emphasized was the need for berthing and a galley with those being way down on the list of priorities and moving up on the list was the need for handling tough waters at all times of the year and keeping a load of people warm and dry while being transported to the island for a visit.

Her overall size was limited to 30ft-6in on deck in order to fit her slip where she will be kept in Sydney and a bow thruster was added to couple with the single engine and give the owner greater control in a tight docking situation. A single seat was added across the stern of the boat for passengers on those nice sunny days but the rest of the cockpit was kept as open as possible to carry gear and stores. The final change was to slightly contemporize her appearance with a three pane forward windshield and twin sliding windows on each of her cabin sides. She is certainly no traditional appearing lobsterboat like the Storm Petrel was but I really have to say that I like the profile of this new “Pyladian” very much and look forward to seeing how her presence manifests itself on the water. Launching is expected in the late fall of 2013. – Sam Devlin

The Pyladian 31 is available as a custom build from Sam Devlin and his team.

Pyladian31PlanPyladian31Profile

Pyladian 31 Specifications

Length 30 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 31 in.
Power Inboard diesel 300hp
Displacement 9200 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Speed 20 knot cruise/28 knot max

 

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Lingcod Series

Freeboard Variations
Freeboard Variations

 

Any Lingcod series boat is, at its core, a large and fast skiff. It maximizes volume in a rugged hull design that balances performance and ride comfort with versatility. It’s also a larger extension of a venerable line of the Cackler boats. Most importantly, every one of the Lingcod designs is a platform for whole range of uses. In their standard center console form, the Lingcods are workhorses, just as useful as a pickup truck when it comes to hauling loads, going fishing and hunting, or taking supplies out to remote locations. But that’s just the beginning. Start with a dependable high volume hull, and make it whatever you want. Change the seating layout, put a pilothouse on it, or at the extreme, turn it into a compact houseboat, a tiny house on the water, a mobile vacation getaway. The study plans include well designed houseboat conversion concepts just to get you started. Although the Lingcods are rooted in proven Devlin designs, they are a blank canvas waiting for you to paint your perfect boat.

The Lingcod is available in study and full construction plans in 3 sizes:

Lingcod 21 ( aka Little Cod)

Lingcod 24

Lingcod 27

The are also study plans for the Lingcod 32. Contact Lee to purchase a set.

LittleCodSkiff
Lingcod 21

 

Lingcod 24
Lingcod 24

Lingcod 24 Specifications

Length on Deck 24 ft. – 1.125 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 9 in.
Draft 11 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 3200 lbs.
Hull Type Planing

Lingcod27Profile

27 Housboat Plan
27 Housboat Plan

Lingcod 27 Specifications

Length on Deck 27 ft. – 1 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 9 in.
Draft 12 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 3300 lbs.
Hull Type Planing

Lingcod32HBProfile

Lingcod 32 Houseboat Plan
Lingcod 32 Houseboat Plan
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Amak Tugboats

Amak 44 Cabin
Amak 44 Cabin

Tugboats have been a long standing theme in my life and I started my tug-affliction at an early age.  When I was in kindergarten at the age of 5, I won an art competition with a tugboat composition and even though the medium was smeary crayon, it showed some promise of tug-work in my design quiver even at that young phase of my life.  During my college years, I worked on several different tugs in Alaska, saving my money and helping to grubstake me thru school at the University of Oregon.  The very first tug that I worked on was named the ‘Amak’ and a fine example of the type she was, home ported in Ketchikan, Alaska and as I recall, built in the late 1890s. She was wood, of course, nicely detailed (though she was a working tug), had a Cat diesel engine and after just a few days on board, I was hooked.  The ‘Amak’ was to change my life. I read issue #1 of WoodenBoat magazine onboard her and made up my mind that boats, indeed wooden boats, were to be my life choice of hobby, avocation, passion, and career.

To celebrate the spirit of that first tug, I have named these models, in all their sizes, the ‘Amak’ series and I tell you this, in all confidence, that if my ship ever comes in and I reach a time in my life when I want to slow down just a bit, I would like to build one of these boats and do a bit more tugging myself.  You can look at the designs and dream all the modifications you might want but always keep in mind that a tug needs quite a bit of weight, a big screw (propeller), and some old style horsepower to keep her happy. Enjoy!  — Sam Devlin

The entire series is available in study plans. Contact Sam to develop your custom dream tugboat.

Amak 26
Amak 26

Amak 26 Specifications

Length on Deck 26 ft. – 3 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 39 in.
Power Inboard diesel 30-100hp
Displacement 9000 lbs.
Amak 32
Amak 32

Amak 32 Specifications

Length on Deck 32 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 10 in.
Draft 44 in.
Power Inboard diesel 50-100hp
Displacement 18000 lbs.
Amak 38
Amak 38

Amak 38 Specifications

Length on Deck 37 ft. – 4 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 4 in.
Draft 50 in.
Power Inboard diesel 120-250hp
Displacement 33000 lbs.
Amak 44
Amak 44
Amak 44 Deck Plan
Amak 44 Deck Plan

Amak 44 Specifications

Length on Deck 43 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 14 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 69 in.
Power Inboard diesel 200-350hp
Displacement 45000 lbs.
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Kingfisher 30

Kingfisher30FAcropA fellow dropped into my office a couple of months ago with a novel idea. He is the owner of a Power Scow which is a type of boat I would expect only a few readers of my design write-ups to be familiar with. A power scow is pretty much what the name says; it is a powered barge on the water long used in the Southeast Alaska fisheries as buy boats which are boats that goes out to the fishing grounds, buys fish from the fishing boats and sells ice and other limited supplies to the fishermen. After filling their own holds with fresh caught fish, the buy boat heads off to the nearest town or cannery to offload. This chap has a particularly nice power scow built in the 1940s and he has done a yeoman’s job of keeping her in good shape and running condition. She has the latest fillet machines, flash freezing capabilities and vacuum packing on board and for these premium line caught salmon and halibut, she does an extraordinary job of keeping the fish fresh, clean, and ready for the freezer or the skillet.

But back to our visit — you see he is a visionary type of guy always thinking out into the future with a keen eye on the prize of keeping his power scow working hard and efficiently and also keeping several fish markets and a growing internet market supplied with his amazing product. These Alaskan fish are of such quality that anyone could provide them a place in their diet without fear or regret. But he had a new vision one that was just at the wee starting place of forming shape and that is where his visit with me came into the picture. He was thinking that there might be a small number of individuals who are in their late middle years, perhaps even retired from their first careers, but not yet ready to hang it all up. These individuals might also want a bit of adventure in their lives, ready to see waters and areas that they hadn’t the time to do earlier in their lives and careers. And so he was thinking that these hardy souls might be interested in setting up small fishing businesses built around the design that I am outlining here and built around his power scow.

With the power scow, he would have the facilities for the fishermen to drop off their catch on a daily basis, take a shower and have a hot meal each day, and maybe even a hand or two of cards before crawling into the sack. Up at dawn, or just a bit before dawn, to drop in on the morning bite and they are back to work. If a longer trip is desired to explore a little, the accommodations on the Kingfisher are compatible to the skipper and crew and anything from a couple of days to a longer trip might be possible, springing them only slightly loose from the friends and convenience of the power scow each night.

So let’s take a closer look at the Kingfisher design that I came up with. She is not a huge boat at just over 30 feet in length but with that utility of staying close to the mothership, she really doesn’t need to be much longer and therefore have good fuel economy and seaworthy comfort for the crew. She can be rigged for either hand trolling (non-powered gurdies which control the lines for bringing the fish into the boat) or she can be powered with a small hydraulic pump that would run off the engine and can be rigged as a power troller. There are twin 18 foot long trolling poles on either side of the single mast and these are lowered to about a 45 degree angle off the port and starboard sides of the boats helping to keep the fishing lines out of each other’s way. They can also be used to set small paravanes for running when the weather is really snotty and these simple gear additions can really make the difference between just a crappy day and one that could provide you with real story fodder. If you are anything like me, even though I like a good story, the older I get, the less I desire to experience those “really good” story days if you follow my drift. Anyway, the paravanes work very well at allowing the boat to continue into waters that might really blunt the progress of an unstabilized hull.

There is good deck space and instead of a fixed cargo hold (which could be done but a simpler solution is available), we are using large poly plastic totes that are chucked on the deck and when offloading fish, a bag that is held in the tub can be hoisted to the buy boat and a simple cleaning of the deck and totes is all that is necessary to keep the boat clean and organized. Moving forward into the pilothouse, the cabin follows a couple of ideas that I might have tried to hit you over the head with in the past but without hearing much of a thud, I want to try them again and they involve two subjects that need addressing. The first is the head and how to keep the crew and the skipper happy and comfortable. While the Kingfisher concept is one that might involve a single fisherman on board, (and my first inclination was to reduce the need or desire to have anything like a private head compartment on board), upon presenting the preliminary sketches to my co-workers, I was told rather bluntly that the boat would need a head to have any chance at seeing the light of day as a concept. So let’s address the idea of how to deal with a head in a boat and have it be really be functional enough to allow some privacy when being used. One of the features I noticed on lots of working boats, fishing and tug, is that the head compartment is very often not common or connected to the interior of the boat. That is to say they are accessed from the stern or side decks of the boat with an entirely separate door to the deck. And with no common door to the interior of the boat, you have a chance to actually use the head with some semblance of privacy. Once a common door to the inside of the boat gets put in the design, those privacy features go literally out the door. If you use the head for a shower, then you have the additional problem of what to do after adding considerable moisture into the interior of a boat that might be operating in a high humidity environment and the problem of how to truly and easily dry out the boat, which leads nicely into the second thought of mine.

Kingfisher30FAHeat is a problem in most boats that run in the Northwest coastal waters of North America (my favorite and most often frequented waters), and it’s not called the rainy northwest for nothing! It’s not unusual for a typical cruiser or boater to do a long trip up to Alaska and back and never once put on a short sleeved shirt in the whole summer. In fact, we occasionally have summers where wool shirts and jackets are worn every day as a hedge against the cool and moist climate. On virtually all Northwest Coast working boats they fix this problem with a simple and ingenious solution, one that anything from a 20 feet cruiser up to a boat well over a hundred feet in length can use. The solution is an oil cooking range. Some of the best of these and the ones most common in the Northwest are made by the Dickinson company of British Columbia just to the north of my own Washington State. They come in a variety of sizes and configurations and the idea is that they are lit early in the trip, even sometimes before the engine is started, the thermostat and heat control has simple settings and burning diesel or even a cleaner burn with kerosene fuel, they just sit there and heat away, letting the whole interior of the boat stay warm and dry. The cast iron top of the stove radiates the heat very well and a pot can be kept on one of the corners instantly providing you with warm beverage capability whenever desired. If you come into the interior of the boat with wet rain gear, the boat doesn’t instantly fog up with the added moisture and you keep your windows clear and warm your bones up very quickly. I call this the ‘haven of warmth’ theory, and if you ever try it, you too will realize that when you wrap your head around the idea that the boat is always warm and dry no matter what the conditions are outside, you will quickly think of your boat as being protective and a haven of warmth and comfort. So even if we are foolish enough to have the door to the head opening into the interior of the boat, we can still dry her out quickly after taking a hot shower and everything will stay smelling nice and sweet.

I say that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and to my eye, this design looks just about right with good utility and function and she is trailerable to boot. With her inboard diesel engine, the fuel economy is good and depending on how much horsepower you give her, the speed can be adjusted from anything in the full displacement range up to semi-displacements speeds. – Sam Devlin

The Kingfisher 30 is available as study plans and as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

Kingfisher30PlanKingfisher30Side

Kingfisher 30 Specifications

Length on Deck 30 ft. – 2 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 1 in.
Draft 38 in.
Power Inboard diesel 110-160hp
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Displacement 10700 lbs.

 

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