Wild Washingtonian Storms Maine Boatbuilders Show

Sam Devlin spent the weekend in Portland. I’m sure that many positive things happened while he was there. After all, the photo above shows us a picture of a peaceful boat builder in front of the beautiful Adeline, the first build of the Pelicano 20. However, evidence suports a theory that not all is quiet back East. Turns out, there is a political controversy over the venue, and Sam found himself on the news, right in middle of the fight. The phrase, “Can’t take this guy anywhere,” comes to mind.

 

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Site Update March 2016

So, in a long awaited milestone, the Devlin site now encompasses the entire Devlin Design catalog. Well, the entire design catalog that I know about anyway. It wouldn’t surprise me a bit if Sam has a baker’s dozen more designs tucked into a folder somewhere. In any case, it is with profound satisfaction that I point out the completion of the biggest chunk of the data on this site. I’d like to offer a few tips on how to zero in on the boats you want and explain the next steps for the revamping of Devlin’s online presence.

First off, search is your friend. If you know the model of the design, search will pin it down in one step. If not, every design is tagged with good descriptors. Try searching for “outboard” or “fishing” for example. That said, nothing is perfect, and if I missed an obvious tag for a particular boat, please let me know.

Second, we have some top level links to take you to lists of boats in basic categories of how they are powered. We also have availability lists for plans and kits. I am aware that these can yield very long lists, which is fun in a “browsing through boats” way, but We have plans to subdivide into more specific categories groupings and lists, so that you can easily find boats that work for your ideas of how you want to use a boat.

If you care to sign up and log in, you can comment on anything on the site. I ask that you keep those comments topical and clean. The first comment you post will need to be allowed by me. After that, your posts will appear immediately. We do reserve the right to revoke your permission to post for any reason, but if you are not posting all the usual “bad things” of the modern internet, you have nothing to worry about. If you find yourself removed from the site for no apparent reason, feel free to contact me to make your case. Odds are that it happened because you a) looked like a spammy Russian, or b) I did something stupid.

As many of you have noted, the current store is completely useless on a smartphone. To fix this problem, I am planning to rebuild the entire store on a platform that is completely responsive to tablets and smartphones. In fact, that is the very next step on my list. The store as it exists must die!

Sam has produced an enormous amount of work in the past 4 decades. You can see that easily here. The logical outcome is that there are probably about 10 bazillion errors on the site. I am happy to fix anything you find. On the other hand, anything Sam finds will get fixed first, and he is picky, picky.

That same 40 years of work has produced over 76000 photos. I am not claiming that I rooted out all of the photos that apply to any given boat, or even the best, so if you want your boat to stand as an example of a particular design, I am happy to oblige. I need some info, anything you think is relevant, and some photos with enough resolution to post. The old site had many tiny images. I like big images. Maybe because I’m getting old, and I have bifocals. The new site is standardized on 1200 pixels of resolution. Anything at that size or bigger is perfectly fine. If you don’t know, right-click on your image and select properties/details.

And finally, one of the most compelling things about Devlin’s work is the stories that seem to sprout without any deliberation. We are starting a customer showcase that allows you to share your stories, and I hope that you will choose to do so. Devlin boats allow people to step outside the normal bounds of life into grand adventures, family togetherness, a handing down of tradition, or just good old fashioned adventure. Please feel free to share. If you are not comfortable with the technology, please email me for help or to translate for you. I’m happy to help.

 

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Maine Boatbuilders Show

Adeline at the dock

Sam is heading east for the Main Boatbuilders show in less than two weeks. He’ll be out there with ‘Adeline’, Henry Clews’ fabulous Devlin built Pelicano 20. He probably has some other trouble in mind for the show as well, like possibly eating some delicious lobsta or some tag team wrestling with other boatbuilders. The only way to find out is to visit him at the show. In all seriousness, boat shows are a great time to meet Sam, to see some of his work, and to ask questions of a leading veteran boat designer. See the show site for the details.

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Millie Hill 28

MillieHill28RenderHelmA good friend and boatbuilder in Korea commissioned this design. It followed some correspondence that we had about a preliminary design on the same concept done originally in 25ft. of length with a 10ft. beam but we quickly realized that if we really intended this to be a potential live aboard “Shanty Boat”, that some extra length and beam would pay dividends and give us much more room to work and live with and we quickly landed on this 28 ft x 12 ft version.

This idea of a “Shanty Boat’ is a beguiling one that holds many hours of musings and dreams in its web;  the concept of doing a vessel that is commodious enough to really be comfortable as a live-aboard and one that could be moved from place to place either by water or by land as she is still of a size that a good flatbed trailer could move her about with ease.  Imagine all the different adventures that we might have with her, perhaps starting down the Mississippi River, stopping for any length of time in all the interesting spots you discover, anchoring when privacy is desired and stopping MillieHill28RenderGalleyperiodically at marinas to pick up enough supplies to keep us in food and drinks.  With the proper sized outboard, she could actually move-about under her own power enough to justify the expense and mess of rigging a control station. But a real salt would match her with a small tug (something like one of our Godzilla 22 or 25ft. models) and tow her about, using the tug like the car/pickup that all conventional landlocked campers have.  Anchor in some secluded little bight in the waterway and use the tug to go to town re-stocking the larder or perhaps just for a break and a meal.  Return to the mother ship and you’ve got your home intact and waiting patiently for you.

She has a good amount of space on her covered rear deck. This deck is at a lower level closer to the waterline which helps make boarding and exiting the boat easier and also allows us to sit in the shade on a warm day.  If you fancy doing a bit of sunning, you’ve got a couple of options — either the fore-deck or it wouldn’t be all that difficult to climb up onto the foreward cabin top for a view of the world that would be unmatched.

MillieHill28RenderRoof

MillieHill28RenderSalonBut it is the cabin with its volume and spaces that really is the attraction of this boat with all the functions of a normal home — kitchen, bath, lounging, sleeping, stowage, bookshelves and entertainment center.  If you really fancy living off the grid, a simple little gas or diesel generator could be fitted that would allow her to be fully functional and self-contained, but she also would be fitted with shore power connections that allows you to hook up to electrical at the marina.  It is also simple to hook up to marina pressure water making her a completely functional floating home.  The Millie Hill 28 has a full sized queen bed that can be arranged in a couple of ways and with both sides of the bed accessible, it’s ready to crawl into easily and comfortably.  There is a full dinette that can seat 4 adults for a meal and with the opposing seat/couch, you can find yourself with a couple of possibilities for settling in for the evening. Stowage is built into the bases of these seating areas, always with the thought in mind that there seems to never be enough space for MillieHill28RenderPlanstowage on a boat.  There are little bonus areas also — a computer desk on the starboard side that allows a space for this very vital function of modern life and a hanging locker on the port side.  There is a shower in the head compartment and if desired, there’s even room for an all-in-one washer/dryer to be fitted into the underside of the linen stowage area in the head.  Virtually every function of the normal home can be accommodated but most importantly, you can move the Millie Hill to wherever you desire which is really the key to this platform.  There might be many hundreds of options of how you configure your own interior or set her up but the footprint of a bi-level cabin, with boarding area in the stern and the possibility of moving her about either under her own power or with a tug tow, is not to be understated.

Plans are available for $225 dollars and we have both Metric or Imperial measurement versions. — Sam Devlin

The Millie Hill 28 is available in study and construction plans, and as a custom build from Sam and his team.

MillieHill28RenderProfileMillieHill28PlanMillieHill28Profile

Millie Hill 28 Specifications

Length 38 ft. – 5 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 13 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 14000 lbs.
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Blue Peter 30

A glimpse into a boat capable of true off-shore cruising, Blue Peter is offered in two versions that illustrate just how much variation can happen on the same footprint.

The rig change is most dramatic. From a profile sail plan view with one version showing bowsprit and a more open slot between staysail and jib to the other showing a stem headed sail plan. Moving inside, the stem-headed version shows the interior that is my personal favorite. Stepping into the companionway, one can see clearly to the bow of the boat. By keeping the head aft and to starboard, it doesn’t cut up the interior into two separate cabins. The galley is to port with enough space to get the job done and with close proximity to the cockpit, a quick duck below for a cup of tea during a long night watch is possible.

Large port and starboard settees with a dinette table amidships allows comfortable seating and the chance to sit and tell stories with friends. Relaxing after a long day’s sail seems more important with the older I get. The port and starboard settees and double berth forward accommodate a crew of four.

The bowsprit version shows a much different interior with port and starboard quarter berths and a fixed chart table to starboard used by sitting on the end of the starboard berth. The galley is to port with a peninsula into the cabin to allow a close-to-centerline sink location, good for draining on either tack. The port and starboard settees, somewhat offset, don’t allow for as easy a conversation area as the other interior but should work well at sea with berths on either tack.

The head with shower is on the starboard side and a single forward berth is to the opposite. This interior would probably cruise off-shore more efficiently than the other with more possible sea berths but in my view, it isn’t quite as comfortable for on shore cruising where most evenings, the Blue Peter would be anchored in a quiet cove.

Inboard diesel power of up to 18 hp is a must on a boat like Blue Peter. Being as fine a mate as most, she’s a good looking boat with an agreeable profile. — Sam Devlin

The Blue Peter is available as a custom build from Sam and his team.

Blue Peter 30 Specifications

Length (LOD) 30 ft. – 2 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 55 in.
Power Inboard diesel 18hp
Hull Type Displacement

 

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Moss Rock

Moss Rock began life as the solution to the living requirements of a client. He wanted to live on the water in a simple, roomy comfortable boat that was easy to maintain. He also wanted a stable platform in which to cruise Puget Sound with his aging parents.

The result is a rig that is simple and inexpensive, a gaff sloop with galvanized rigging. The volume needed for a live-aboard also suggested the scow-type hull. That shape also yields an interior that is roomy and comfortable which, with the right touch, has a cottage coziness. The port aft section easily accommodates a standard double mattress with the settee and chart table completing the port mid-section. The head has a water closet and a self-contained shower unit located in the starboard mid-section next to the galley and the wood or diesel heating stove. The center board trunk divides the cabin providing pantry shelves on the galley side and book shelves on the port side. The cabin has full standing headroom with the large port lights keeping the interior well-lit and homey.

The deck plan shows no footwell aft; a helm seat accompanies the large wheel. Auxiliary power can be in the form of an inboard diesel with the shaft set off-center or a 35 HP outboard in a well.

The foredeck has a large 36 in x 36 in hatch giving access to organized stowage below. There are 10 inch bulwarks fore and aft and a raised deck in the way of a deck house. Moss Rock exudes a charm of her own and would not look out of place in a wooded cove with sails furled and potted plants on the decks. — Sam Devlin

The Moss Rock is available as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

MossRockPlanRoughMossRockProfileRough

Moss Rock Specifications

Length on Deck 30 ft. – 0 in.
Beam 12 ft. – 0 in.
Draft 24 in.
Power Inboard diesel or outboard 35hp
Hull Type Displacement
Sail area 527 sq. ft.
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Czarinna 30

Czarinna30ErieCanalShe is a very traditional looking yacht with a plumb bow and a fantail stern forming the ends of an easily driven hull. Her forward pilothouse meshes nicely with a large beamy main salon aft of the helm/galley area. Comfort underway is of main importance here with 6’4″ head room in the main salon. Four large opening windows in the salon area are set to perfect viewing height while seated in the salon. There is also a large 24″ x 36″ hatch/skylight on the salon cabin top which hinges upward for ventilation.

The head is on the starboard side, at the aft end of the main salon. With the water closet and a remarkable Pullman-style sink/wash basin that folds onto the bulkhead, this head compartment can convert into a shower stall for longer cruises.

A solid-fuel heater is mounted on the forward bulkhead of the head. In winter, the boat is warm and dry without the sweating and mildew problems normally associated with most boats in today’s market. In the summer, the feeling in the main salon is like sitting in a large screened porch. Both settees are 68″ long and double as berths. There is a folding leaf table which can accommodate anything from casual drinks to formal dining for four.

Forward of the main salon is the raised pilothouse with port and starboard helm seats and galley space aft on both sides. Refrigeration tucks neatly below the companion helm seat and there is stowage on both sides under the counters. A propane stove allows the cook to enjoy the ride in the pilothouse with excellent visibility and full 72″ headroom. Forward in the fo’c’sle, accessible through a hinged hatch, is a large berth and storage area. This can be a private suite or out-of-the-way storage.

The twin 18 hp YANMAR diesels will cruise Czarinna at 7 knots at 1900 RPM. Czarinna30LateThe noise, vibration and smell normally associated with high speed boats just doesn’t develop on Czarinna. Each engine is tucked out of the way, under the settees, port and starboard, in a sound insulated seat compartment. Fuel consumption is very economical, two-thirds of a gallon of diesel per hour, at her cruising speed of 7 knots. It’s hard to imagine cruising more economically than this these days.

— Sam Devlin

The Czarinna 30 is available in study and full construction plans, and as a custom build from Devlin Boats.

Czarinna30PlanCzarinna30Profile

Czarinna 30 Specifications

Length 29 ft. – 10 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 6 in.
Draft 30 in.
Power Inboard diesel twin 18hp
Displacement 8900 lbs.
Hull Type Displacement
Speed 7 knot cruise
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Black Crown 30

BlackCrownBigWaterWe have over the past 20 years built our Black Crown design in many, many flavors, from 25ft. to 32ft in lengths and now offer the full building plans for home construction the distillation of all our experience with the design and what she has to offer.

This new 30ft. version offers a commodious and comfortable cockpit with space for the engine box (we recommend a diesel Sterndrive in 160-250hp range) and seating for crew when the hook is down and you just want to enjoy the evening breeze. Going into the cabin there is a full enclosed and private head to starboard and a full headroom shower just opposite on the port side. Forward of the shower is a fore and aft facing dinette with room to seat 4 for cocktails or an intimate dinner. Galley is to starboard and forward of the head and aft of the helm seat. Space for a below counter refrigerator/freezer unit, sink, and range oven cook top. Helm seat is to starboard and forward of the galley as mentioned above and has excellent visibility and comfortable seating, room for electronics instruments etc.

BlackCrownHelm

On the port side of the boat and opposite the helm is a side facing co-helm seat that works well for keeping an extra pair of eyes scanning forward while the boat is running but also allowing good conversation with the skipper. Forward of the main salon area is a large double berth that can be built with either a queen sized double slightly to starboard side or a port and starboard single berth that with a filler can be converted to a huge double berth running the full length of the bow and full width of the forward cabin (this is my own personal favorite arrangement). There is 6-5 headroom in the main salon cabin and good seating and sleeping headroom forward in the bow area.

BlackCrownDriftwoodQPerformance is good with a 200hp. Diesel Sterndrive giving her top speed of 25knots and a cruise speed of 18knots with a fuel burn of just under 5 gallons of fuel per hour. That gives you a fuel burn of 4.17 miles for each gallon of fuel used and that my friends is just about a good mileage as can be managed with a boat!

She can be loaded to a trailer for winter storage and these hulls are more than capable of traveling some very long cruises whether you are on the East Coast or the West Coast the Black Crown 30 can handle the seas and the waters that you will encounter and handle them with aplomb!

Our friends, Randy and Becky, along with their dog, Kahlua, have now trailered their Black Crown from Lake Powell up to the Puget Sound and back again with fine adventures and nothing more than a good 3/4 ton pickup with a diesel engine to tow it with fine living for those of us that keep perspective on the play vs. work balancing game. — Sam Devlin

The Black Crown is available in study and construction plans, as a custom build from Devlin Boats, and currently as a pre-loved Devlin Boat.

BlackCrown30PlanBlackCrown30Side

 

Black Crown 30 Specifications

Length 30 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 10 ft. – 8.58 in.
Draft 26 in.
Power Inboard diesel stern drive
Displacement 10500 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Speed 18 knot cruise/29 knot max
Range 450 miles @ 18 knots

 

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Pyladian 31

Many of you faithful readers might remember the “Storm Petrel”, a 33ft. Lobster-type boat that we built several years ago, and the “Pyladian” is an evolution and direct sister to that design. With the perspective of about 5 years between the two building projects and with a chance to spend many happy hours bugging about in the Salish Sea in the Storm Petrel, I found her to be, in my opinion, one of the best performing sea-boats that I have ever had the pleasure of running. I remember heading north with my good friend George Gray (currently living with his wife on their sailboat and cruising the lovely waters of Mexico) to the Anacortes Trawler Fest show several years ago. It was a boisterous day with brisk winds of 25-30 knots coming out of the Southwest. With the fetch of Puget Sound and the short steep chop that can develop in those waters, it was a good test of what the Storm Petrel could do. With the following seas and our trying to maintain a pace of 16 plus knots of speed, the Storm Petrel would bound over the top of the crest of one wave and then pitch downward into the trough between the seas burying her bow into the wave just ahead of us till we could see water squirting up thru the anchor roller forward. Without slowing or slewing around in any way, she would then climb at the same speed up the face of the next wave reaching the top before pitching down again into the trough of the next. After about 30 minutes of this exhilarating ride, I remarked to George something about my amazement of such a remarkable ride to which he replied that he was impressed also. We chatted for a few more minutes about her amazing performance and no sooner had the words come out of my mouth, “we should turn around and try her head into the wind”, when I started turning the wheel. We did a good 15 minutes in reverse direction straight into the eye of the wind and those cresting waves with essentially the same results. The boat didn’t slow down and certainly didn’t broach or slew at the bottom of the troughs even when burying her nose deeply into the waves. Really, all in all, she showed remarkable capability for those seas, an incredibly pleasant boat to run on a day when I would normally wish I was home reading a good book by a warm fire. This combination of fine bow lines and entry with her broad and flat exit of run of the hull was literally the perfect example of what one would wish for in this type of boat.

So after some years, along came a new candidate for a boat, this time a couple that was looking for a commuter boat to run from Vancouver Island, specifically Sydney, British Columbia, to their island home located about 34 miles north in the Canadian Gulf Islands. They needed her to be able to make good and economical speed so that they could spend their time on the island not just going back and forth to it. The boat needed to be able to handle anything from a few groceries to large units of wood, fuel, and all the myriad of items necessary for comfortable island life. The weather would not always be compatible to this lifestyle and so the vessel would need to be able to handle the weather in whatever form that would be presented to it.

With those requirements set down, I had no hesitation in recommending the Storm Petrel type hull as a good model to choose from. But the customers wanted a single diesel (not the twin diesels that the Storm Petrel had) and needed the potential for more speed than the Storm Petrel boat had so the Yanmar 6LPA was chosen. With 300 horses under her engine box, the hull should top speed out at about 26-28 knots and cruise at 20 knots without difficulty. With the single diesel layout, the cabin changes considerably in its layout and in the potential layout options for the customers. De-emphasized was the need for berthing and a galley with those being way down on the list of priorities and moving up on the list was the need for handling tough waters at all times of the year and keeping a load of people warm and dry while being transported to the island for a visit.

Her overall size was limited to 30ft-6in on deck in order to fit her slip where she will be kept in Sydney and a bow thruster was added to couple with the single engine and give the owner greater control in a tight docking situation. A single seat was added across the stern of the boat for passengers on those nice sunny days but the rest of the cockpit was kept as open as possible to carry gear and stores. The final change was to slightly contemporize her appearance with a three pane forward windshield and twin sliding windows on each of her cabin sides. She is certainly no traditional appearing lobsterboat like the Storm Petrel was but I really have to say that I like the profile of this new “Pyladian” very much and look forward to seeing how her presence manifests itself on the water. Launching is expected in the late fall of 2013. – Sam Devlin

The Pyladian 31 is available as a custom build from Sam Devlin and his team.

Pyladian31PlanPyladian31Profile

Pyladian 31 Specifications

Length 30 ft. – 6 in.
Beam 9 ft. – 3 in.
Draft 31 in.
Power Inboard diesel 300hp
Displacement 9200 lbs.
Hull Type Semi-Displacement
Speed 20 knot cruise/28 knot max

 

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Lingcod Series

Freeboard Variations
Freeboard Variations

 

Any Lingcod series boat is, at its core, a large and fast skiff. It maximizes volume in a rugged hull design that balances performance and ride comfort with versatility. It’s also a larger extension of a venerable line of the Cackler boats. Most importantly, every one of the Lingcod designs is a platform for whole range of uses. In their standard center console form, the Lingcods are workhorses, just as useful as a pickup truck when it comes to hauling loads, going fishing and hunting, or taking supplies out to remote locations. But that’s just the beginning. Start with a dependable high volume hull, and make it whatever you want. Change the seating layout, put a pilothouse on it, or at the extreme, turn it into a compact houseboat, a tiny house on the water, a mobile vacation getaway. The study plans include well designed houseboat conversion concepts just to get you started. Although the Lingcods are rooted in proven Devlin designs, they are a blank canvas waiting for you to paint your perfect boat.

The Lingcod is available in study and full construction plans in 3 sizes:

Lingcod 21 ( aka Little Cod)

Lingcod 24

Lingcod 27

The are also study plans for the Lingcod 32. Contact Lee to purchase a set.

LittleCodSkiff
Lingcod 21

 

Lingcod 24
Lingcod 24

Lingcod 24 Specifications

Length on Deck 24 ft. – 1.125 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 9 in.
Draft 11 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 3200 lbs.
Hull Type Planing

Lingcod27Profile

27 Housboat Plan
27 Housboat Plan

Lingcod 27 Specifications

Length on Deck 27 ft. – 1 in.
Beam 8 ft. – 9 in.
Draft 12 in.
Power Outboard
Displacement 3300 lbs.
Hull Type Planing

Lingcod32HBProfile

Lingcod 32 Houseboat Plan
Lingcod 32 Houseboat Plan
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